layman


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lay·man

 (lā′mən)
n.
1. One who is not a cleric.
2. One who is a nonprofessional in a given field. technical language that is hard for the layman to understand. See Usage Note at man.

layman

(ˈleɪmən)
n, pl -men
1. a man who is not a member of the clergy
2. a person who does not have specialized or professional knowledge of a subject: science for the layman.
Gender-neutral form: layperson

lay•man

(ˈleɪ mən)

n., pl. -men.
1. a person who is not a member of the clergy.
2. a person who is not a member of a given profession, as law or medicine.
[1150–1200]
usage: See -man.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.layman - someone who is not a clergyman or a professional person
laity, temporalty - in Christianity, members of a religious community that do not have the priestly responsibilities of ordained clergy
common man, common person, commoner - a person who holds no title
lay reader - a layman who is authorized by the bishop to read parts of the service in an Anglican or Episcopal church
clergyman, man of the cloth, reverend - a member of the clergy and a spiritual leader of the Christian Church

layman

noun nonprofessional, amateur, outsider, lay person, non-expert, nonspecialist There are basically two types, called, in layman's terms, blue and white asbestos.
Translations
عِلْماني
laik
lægmand
maallikko
laikus
leikmaîur
laik
laikamatér
rahip sınıfından olmayan kimseuğraş dışı kimse

layman

[ˈleɪmən] N (laymen (pl))
1. (Rel) → seglar mf, lego/a m/f
2. (fig) → profano(a) m/f, lego(a) m/f
in layman's termspara entendernos, para los profanos en la materia

layman

[ˈleɪmən] n
(= non-expert) → profane m
in layman's terms → en langage de tous les jours, en termes profanes
(= non-ordained church member) → laïque m

layman

[ˈleɪmən] n (-men (pl)) (Rel) → laico (fig) (non-professional) → profano

lay3

(lei) adjective
1. not a member of the clergy. lay preachers.
2. not an expert or a professional (in a particular subject). Doctors tend to use words that lay people don't understand.
ˈlayman noun
a lay person.
References in classic literature ?
Why, you had scarce gone ere this loathly John came running back again, and, when I oped mouth to reproach him, he asked me whether it was indeed likely that a man of prayer would leave his own godly raiment in order to take a layman's jerkin.
I cannot agree with the painters who claim superciliously that the layman can understand nothing of painting, and that he can best show his appreciation of their works by silence and a cheque-book.
How the Vicar reconciled his answer with the strict notions he supposed himself to hold on these subjects it is beyond a layman's power to tell, though not to excuse.
Truly, good Lord Bishop, many a knight and burgher, clerk and layman, have danced to my music, willy-nilly, and most times greatly against their will; such is the magic of my harping.
He had already, in 1682, written a didactic poem, 'Religio Laici' (A Layman's Religion), in which he set forth his reasons for adhering to the English Church.
But it was quite a natural suggestion for a layman to make."
"Your master," said Sancho, "no doubt is a knight in the Church line, and can bestow rewards of that sort on his good squire; but mine is only a layman; though I remember some clever, but, to my mind, designing people, strove to persuade him to try and become an archbishop.
Truth to say, from the moment he crossed this new steed, it was no longer D'Artagnan who was travelling, -- it was a good man clothed in an iron-gray justaucorps, brown haut-de-chausses, holding the medium between a priest and a layman; that which brought him nearest to the churchman was, that D'Artagnan had placed on his head a calotte of threadbare velvet, and over the calotte, a large black hat; no more sword, a stick, hung by a cord to his wrist, but to which, he promised himself, as an unexpected auxiliary, to join, upon occasion, a good dagger, ten inches long, concealed under his cloak.
They looked upon him, as painters often do writers, with contempt because he was a layman, with tolerance because he practised an art, and with awe because he used a medium in which themselves felt ill-at-ease.
"Why does he not bring out his book, instead of marrying," said Sir James, with a disgust which he held warranted by the sound feeling of an English layman.
Sixty monks, and not a single layman! It is a terrible idea, but it is historic, it is statistic; it is indeed one of those facts which enables an intelligent historian to reconstruct the physiognomy of a special epoch, for it brings out this further point with mathematical accuracy, that the clergy were in those days sixty times richer and more flourishing than the rest of humanity.
His life, before he came to Raveloe, had been filled with the movement, the mental activity, and the close fellowship, which, in that day as in this, marked the life of an artisan early incorporated in a narrow religious sect, where the poorest layman has the chance of distinguishing himself by gifts of speech, and has, at the very least, the weight of a silent voter in the government of his community.