laystall


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laystall

(ˈleɪˌstɔːl)
n
a place where waste and dung is deposited
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
It was to prove a fateful combination for British driver Henry Taylor, racing for the Laystall team.
We stayed at the Staycity Serviced Apartments in Laystall Street - really central and perfect for us.
Travel info | We stayed courtesy of Staycity Apartments, Laystall Street, Manchester.
Not only does Ackroyd change the address of the house where the Lambs lived at the time of the murder, from Little Queen Street to Laystall Street, but he even omits from his account of the events one member of the household, Sarah Lamb, John Lamb's elder sister, who was also present in the house when the murder was committed.
"Lestall" is a form of "laystall," defined by OED as "a place where refuse and dung is laid."
He joins after 18 months with HP Cylinders, part of Laystall, and brings almost 30 years' experience in overseeing production and manufacturing activities in the UK and overseas for organisations including GKN, Federal Mogul and Max Power.
Wolverhampton firm Laystall Engineering which designs and manufactures a wide range of bespoke hydraulic cylinders for the mobile hydraulics market and engine cylinder liners for the automotive sector, started out in 1903 in London specialising in engine repairs.
Laystall now serves an international market place, employs over 100 people and has a turnover in excess of pounds 7 million.
Wolverhampton maker of hydraulic cylinders for earth movers and lifts Laystall Engineering has bought a rival firm in the city in a bid to expand into new markets.
The sale sees it take over Hydraulic Precision, which has branches in Wolverhampton and Telford for an undisclosed sum, boosting Laystall's annual pounds 8 million turnover by pounds 1.2 million.
erected for such as will give great rents" (349); in the Suburbs he describes how the common field near Whitechapel Church "is so encroached upon by building of filthy cottages and with other purpressors, enclosures, and laystalls notwithstanding all proclamations and acts of parliament made to the contrary" (384) and in Tower Street Ward, there was "sometime a large plot of ground, [but is] now greatly straitened by encroachments, unlawfully made and suffered, for gardens and houses" (152).
In the parishes built on swampland, bad water, bad drainage, laystalls and slaughterhouses.