extraction

(redirected from lead extraction)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

ex·trac·tion

 (ĭk-străk′shən)
n.
1. The act of extracting or the condition of being extracted.
2. Something obtained by extracting; an extract.
3. Origin; lineage: of Spanish extraction.

extraction

(ɪkˈstrækʃən)
n
1. the act of extracting or the condition of being extracted
2. something extracted; an extract
3. (Dentistry)
a. the act or an instance of extracting a tooth or teeth
b. a tooth or teeth extracted
4. (Sociology) origin, descent, lineage, or ancestry: of German extraction.

ex•trac•tion

(ɪkˈstræk ʃən)

n.
1. an act or instance of extracting something.
2. descent; ancestry: of foreign extraction.
3. something extracted; extract.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Late Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.extraction - the process of obtaining something from a mixture or compound by chemical or physical or mechanical meansextraction - the process of obtaining something from a mixture or compound by chemical or physical or mechanical means
decoction - (pharmacology) the extraction of water-soluble drug substances by boiling
drying up, evaporation, desiccation, dehydration - the process of extracting moisture
elution - the process of extracting one material from another by washing with a solvent to remove adsorbed material from an adsorbent (as in washing of loaded ion-exchange resins to remove captured ions); used to obtain uranium ions
infusion - the process of extracting certain active properties (as a drug from a plant) by steeping or soaking (usually in water)
beneficiation, mineral dressing, mineral extraction, mineral processing, ore dressing, ore processing - crushing and separating ore into valuable substances or waste by any of a variety of techniques
natural action, natural process, action, activity - a process existing in or produced by nature (rather than by the intent of human beings); "the action of natural forces"; "volcanic activity"
2.extraction - properties attributable to your ancestry; "he comes from good origins"
ancestry, filiation, lineage, derivation - inherited properties shared with others of your bloodline
full blood - descent from parents both of one pure breed
3.extraction - the action of taking out something (especially using effort or force)extraction - the action of taking out something (especially using effort or force); "the dentist gave her a local anesthetic prior to the extraction"
remotion, removal - the act of removing; "he had surgery for the removal of a malignancy"

extraction

noun
1. origin, family, ancestry, descent, race, stock, blood, birth, pedigree, lineage, parentage, derivation He married a young lady of Indian extraction.
2. taking out, drawing, pulling, withdrawal, removal, uprooting, extirpation the extraction of wisdom teeth
3. distillation, separation, derivation High temperatures are used during the extraction of cooking oils.

extraction

noun
One's ancestors or their character or one's ancestral derivation:
Translations
أصْل، نَسَبإقْتِلاع سِن
afstamningoprindelseudtrækning
uppruni; ætterniútdráttur

extraction

[ɪksˈtrækʃən] N (gen) → extracción f
of Spanish extractionde extracción española

extraction

[ɪkˈstrækʃən] n
(= descent) to be of Scottish extraction → être d'origine écossaise
Welsh by extraction → d'origine galloise
[tooth] → extraction f
[mineral, coal] → extraction f

extraction

n
(= process of extracting)Herausnehmen nt; (of cork etc)(Heraus)ziehen nt; (of juice, minerals, oil, DNA, energy)Gewinnung f; (of bullet, foreign body)Entfernung f; (of information, secrets)Entlocken nt; (of confession, money) → Herausholen nt; (of permission, promise, concession)Abringen nt, → Erlangen nt
(Dentistry: = act of extracting) → (Zahn)ziehen nt, → Extraktion f (spec); he had to have an extractionihm musste ein Zahn gezogen werden
(= descent)Herkunft f, → Abstammung f; of Spanish extractionspanischer Herkunft or Abstammung

extraction

[ɪksˈtrækʃn] nestrazione f; (descent) → origine f
of German extraction → di origine tedesca

extract

(ikˈstrӕkt) verb
1. to pull out, or draw out, especially by force or with effort. I have to have a tooth extracted; Did you manage to extract the information from her?
2. to select (passages from a book etc).
3. to take out (a substance forming part of something else) by crushing or by chemical means. Vanilla essence is extracted from vanilla beans.
(ˈekstrӕkt) noun
1. a passage selected from a book etc. a short extract from his novel.
2. a substance obtained by an extracting process. beef/yeast extract; extract of malt.
exˈtraction (-ʃən) noun
1. race or parentage. He is of Greek extraction.
2. (an) act of extracting eg a tooth.

ex·trac·tion

n. extracción, proceso de extraer, separar o sacar afuera.

extraction

n (dent, etc.) extracción f
References in periodicals archive ?
Fact.MR has announced the addition of the "Pacemaker/Defibrillator Lead Extraction Kits Market Forecast, Trend Analysis & Competition Tracking - Global Review 2018 to 2028"report to their offering.
Summary: A large number of companies, however, are on the verge of clearing the clinical trials for implantable pacemakers, which is further expected to drive the revenue generation in global pacemaker/defibrillator lead extraction kits market.
Successful transvenous lead extraction using the Evolution system in a 17-kg child.
Often, the old lead is capped and left alone to avoid complications of lead extraction such as arrhythmias and cardiac perforation.
Lead extraction was without complications and a temporary pacemaker on the ipsilateral side was in place for two weeks before a new permanent pacemaker was implanted.
This edition has been revised and updated to incorporate recent developments, has new chapters on lead extraction indications and techniques and arrhythmias in patients with congenital heart disease, and has updated images and figures.
Pacemaker pocket infection is an indication for complete device removal, with transvenous lead extraction. Under antimicrobial therapy, a new pacing system will be reimplanted [6].
The company added that the Bridge Occlusion Balloon for temporary vessel occlusion builds on the long-standing clinical success and proven procedural safety of cardiac lead extraction. The device is designed to reduce blood loss in the rare event of a tear, including in the superior vena cava (SVC), providing a 'bridge' to surgical intervention.
Leads in the heart may be associated with infrequent but serious complications, including lead displacement, fracture and systemic blood infections, or the need for lead extraction, which may lead to hospital readmission, increased mortality and associated costs.
In the boom time of lead extraction in the North Pennines, the Allen Mills site near Allendale was one of the most active smelting centres in the north of England.
Surgical treatment of pacemaker and defibrillator lead endocarditis: the impact of electrode lead extraction on outcome.