lead-in

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lead-in

(lēd′ĭn′)
n.
1. Opening or introductory matter: The joke served as a lead-in to a discussion of more serious matters.
2. A program, as on television, scheduled to precede another.
3. The wire that connects an outdoor antenna to an electronic transmitter or receiver.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lead-in

(ˈliːdˌɪn)
n
1.
a. an introduction to a subject
b. (as modifier): a lead-in announcement.
2. (Telecommunications) the connection between a radio transmitter, receiver, etc, and the aerial or transmission line
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lead′-in`

(lid)

n.
1. something that leads in or introduces.
2. the connection between an antenna and a transmitter or receiving set.
3. the portion of a television or radio broadcast that precedes a commercial.
adj.
4. (of a conductor) carrying input to an electric or electronic device or circuit, esp. from an antenna.
[1910–15]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lead-in - the introductory section of a story; "it was an amusing lead-in to a very serious matter"
news article, news story, newspaper article - an article reporting news
section, subdivision - a self-contained part of a larger composition (written or musical); "he always turns first to the business section"; "the history of this work is discussed in the next section"
2.lead-in - wire connecting an antenna to a receiver or a transmitter to a transmission line
conducting wire, wire - a metal conductor that carries electricity over a distance
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

lead-in

noun
A short section of preliminary remarks:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

lead-in

[ˈliːdˈɪn] Nintroducción f (to a)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

lead-in

nEinführung f (→ to in +acc), → Einleitung f (→ to in +acc)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

lead-in

[ˈliːdˌɪn] nintroduzione f, presentazione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Everyday dialogue makes the story more natural, though stilted deliveries, overused words, and distracting lead-ins make some conversations anticlimactic.
Theretrospectivewill show some 20 shorter films on their own, or as lead-ins to the features.
It should be noted that additional components for a six-week study include a comprehensive Leader Guide which includes a link to downloadable video clips that can be used as lead-ins to group discussion.
The result: Newspaper headlines and TV news lead-ins essentially copied and pasted Rauner's news release headline: "Gov.
In many cases, the host merely follows a preset format and scripted lead-ins, and is actually more of a spiel-reader than the element that gives its show its substance.
But those big bows came on the back of "The Walking Dead," TV's most-watched non-football show: "Fear" is a spin-off, and the premieres of "Saul" and "Badlands" received lead-ins. The latter two saw steep ratings drop-offs later in their seasons, when they no longer followed "The Walking Dead."
The design is intended for installation in small fast-jets, fighter lead-ins, trainers & modified business aircraft, like the U.S.
However it has to be a two-way process; we need clear, consistent, market signals and longer lead-ins, because production systems cannot be changed overnight.
Parabolic lead-ins on the ports save time by shortening the time required to drain a bag by up to 24 percent, while alignment ribs improve fluid flow dynamics by reducing shear impact as material exits the bag.
To quote one the hundreds of attendees: “The product presenters and video lead-ins for RDI, KOMA and Trex were top shelf and eye opening.
The pallet features a smooth closed deck, 1-inch safety perimeter, tapered lead-ins for four-way fork entry, increased footwall stock durability, gusset ribs and a scalloped foot for strength.