leap second


Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to leap second: leap year

leap second

n.
A second of time, as measured by an atomic clock, added to or omitted from official timekeeping systems periodically to compensate for small changes in the rotation of the earth and therefore the length of a solar day.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

leap second

n
(Units) a second added to or removed from a scale for reckoning time on one particular occasion, to synchronize it with another scale
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

leap′ sec`ond


n.
an extra second intercalated into the world's timekeeping system about once a year, made necessary by the gradual slowing down of the earth's rotation.
[1970–75]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.leap second - a second (as measured by an atomic clock) added to or subtracted from Greenwich Mean Time in order to compensate for slowing in the Earth's rotation
s, sec, second - 1/60 of a minute; the basic unit of time adopted under the Systeme International d'Unites
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In both the DST and the leap second debates, there are calls for a consistent, continuous time, much like the one that continental philosophers attribute to clocks.
The exact divergence between astronomical and atomic time is difficult to model or predict, but there are two general reasons why leap seconds are periodically needed.
The last time a leap second was added to clocks was June 30, 2015.
Leap seconds have been added to our days since the 1970s and will continue to be added for years to come.
Since 1972, the keepers of the atomic clocks have sporadically added 25 leap seconds. The difference may not be noticeable to humans, but it confuses computers relying on old software and caused about five minutes of "instability" across the internet, according to web monitoring firm Dyn Inc.
Or I would make the day the leap second falls on an I-pad free day for my kids so that's one extra second they don't get to waste!
The move aims to conform with other timing centres around the world, which will also add a leap second at the same time (11:59:60pm UTC or coordinated universal time on June 30) to adjust for the slight differences in time between highly accurate atomic clocks and the rotation of the globe.
The last leap second was witnessed in 2012 but as predicted, widespread problems across the globe came to the fore.
Dr Helal Al Kaabi, executive director of EMI explained: "Our latest move to add a leap second to the UAE standard time follows a decision by the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service in January 2015 to add a leap second to Coordinated Universal Time at the end of June this year".
Many countries like the USA, France, Mexico and Japan are against leap seconds. And no wonder, since in 2012, the leap second caused several websites such as Mozilla, LinkedIn, Reddit to crash.
"This incident was caused by the Linux bug triggered by the 'leap second' inserted into clocks worldwide on June 30th," read an Amadeus statement on the problem that beautifully understates a complex if predictable software issue affecting some Linux-based programs while leaving others untouched.