learning

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learn·ing

 (lûr′nĭng)
n.
1. The act, process, or experience of gaining knowledge or skill.
2. Knowledge or skill gained through schooling or study. See Synonyms at knowledge.
3. Psychology Behavioral modification especially through experience or conditioning.

learning

(ˈlɜːnɪŋ)
n
1. knowledge gained by study; instruction or scholarship
2. the act of gaining knowledge
3. (Psychology) psychol any relatively permanent change in behaviour that occurs as a direct result of experience

learn•ing

(ˈlɜr nɪŋ)

n.
1. knowledge acquired by systematic study in any field of scholarly application.
2. the act or process of acquiring knowledge or skill.
3. Psychol. the modification of behavior through practice, training, or experience.
[before 900]
syn: learning, erudition, scholarship refer to facts or ideas acquired through systematic study. learning usu. refers to knowledge gained from extensive reading and formal instruction: Her vast learning is reflected in her many books. erudition suggests a thorough and profound knowledge of a difficult subject: His erudition in languages is legendary. scholarship suggests a high degree of mastery in a specialized field, along with an analytical or innovative ability suited to the academic world: The author is renowned for several works of classical scholarship.

Learning


1. the mode of teaching or of procedure in a private school, college, or university.
2. a tendency toward traditionalism or conventionalism in art, literature, music, etc.
3. any attitudes or ideas that are learned or scholarly but lacking in worldliness, common sense, or practicality. — academie, n., adj. — academist, n.
antagonism to learning, education, and the educated, expressed in literature in a conscious display of simplicity, earthiness, even colorful semi-literacy. — anti-intellectual, n., adj.
the process of teaching oneself. — autodidact, n.
1. the state of being a pedantic or literal-minded woman.
2. behavior characteristic of such a woman.
men of learning as a class or collectively; the intelligentsia or literati.
1. the practice of valuing literature, etc., primarily for its instructional content.
2. an inclination to teach or lecture others too much, especially by preaching and moralizing.
3. a pedantic, dull method of teaching. — didact, n. — didactic, adj.
the art or science of teaching.
the state of being devoted to something that is taught. — doctrinist, n.
1. British. aneducator.
2. a specialist in the theory and methods of education. Also called educationalist.
a person who supports or uses the system of kindergarten education developed by Friedrich Froebel, German educational reformer. Also Froebelian.
a student in a gymnasium, a form of high school in Europe. See also athletics.
(in Europe) a name given to a high school at which students prepare for university entrance.
men of letters or learning; scholars as a group.
a scholarly or literary person; one of the literati.
1. the practice of reading, writing, or studying at night, especially by artificial light; “burning the midnight oil.”
2. the art or practice of writing learnedly. — lucubrator, n. — lucubrate, v.
Rare. 1. a late education.
2. the process of acquiring education late in life.
the science of learning.
the science or art of teaching or education. — pedagogue, paedagogue, pedagog, n. — pedagogie, paedagogic, pedagogical, paedagogical, adj.
1. the art of teaching.
2. teaching that is pedantic, dogmatic, and formal.
1. the function or work of a teacher; teaching.
2. the art or method of teaching; pedagogics.
1. the character or practices of a pedant, as excessive display of learning.
2. a slavish attention to rules, details, etc; pedantry. — pedant, n. — pedantic, adj.
rule or government by pedants; domination of society by pedants.
pedanticism, def. 2.
a school of higher education offering instruction in a variety of vocational, technical, and scientific subjects. — polytechnic, adj.
the qualities, actions, and thoughts characteristic of a professor. — professorial, adj.
the basic principles and rules preliminary to the study of an art or science. — propaedeutic, propaedeutical, adj.
in the Middle Ages, one of the two divisions of the seven liberal arts, comprising arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, and music. See also trivium.
objects, as real money, utensils, etc., used by a teacher in the classroom to illustrate aspects of daily life.
a scholar or person of great learning.
a head of a school, especially the head of one of the ancient Athenian schools of philosophy.
1. Ancient Greece. a teacher of rhetoric, philosophy, etc.; hence, a learned person.
2. one who is given to the specious arguments often used by the sophists. — sophistic, sophistical, adj.
1. the teachings and ways of teaching of the Greek sophists.
2. specious or fallacious reasoning, as was sometimes used by the sophists.
a doctor of the Sorbonne, of the University of Paris.
Ancient Greece. the master of a feast or symposium; hence, a person presiding over a banquet or formal discussion.
a person participating in a symposium.
learned discussion of a particular topic. Also spelled symposion.
the study and description of arts and sciences from the point of view of their historical development, geographical, and ethnic distribution.
a person who forms theories or who specializes in the theory of a particular subject.
in the Middle Ages, one of the two divisions of the seven liberal arts, comprising logic, grammar, and rhetoric. See also quadrivium.
Rare. a set of instructions for beginners.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.learning - the cognitive process of acquiring skill or knowledgelearning - the cognitive process of acquiring skill or knowledge; "the child's acquisition of language"
basic cognitive process - cognitive processes involved in obtaining and storing knowledge
conditioning - a learning process in which an organism's behavior becomes dependent on the occurrence of a stimulus in its environment
developmental learning - learning that takes place as a normal part of cognitive development
digestion - learning and coming to understand ideas and information; "his appetite for facts was better than his digestion"
education - the gradual process of acquiring knowledge; "education is a preparation for life"; "a girl's education was less important than a boy's"
internalisation, internalization, incorporation - learning (of values or attitudes etc.) that is incorporated within yourself
imprinting - a learning process in early life whereby species specific patterns of behavior are established
language learning - learning to use a language
committal to memory, memorisation, memorization - learning so as to be able to remember verbatim; "the actor's memorization of his lines"
study, work - applying the mind to learning and understanding a subject (especially by reading); "mastering a second language requires a lot of work"; "no schools offer graduate study in interior design"
carry-over, transfer of training, transfer - application of a skill learned in one situation to a different but similar situation
2.learning - profound scholarly knowledge
education - knowledge acquired by learning and instruction; "it was clear that he had a very broad education"
letters - scholarly attainment; "he is a man of letters"

learning

noun knowledge, study, education, schooling, research, scholarship, tuition, enlightenment The library is the focal point of learning on the campus.
Quotations
"Much learning doth make thee mad" Bible: Acts
"The further one goes, the less one knows" [Lao-tze Tao Te Ching]
"Try to learn something about everything and everything about something" [Thomas Henry Huxley memorial stone]
"Learning without thought is labour lost; thought without learning is perilous" [Confucius Analects]
"A little learning is a dangerous thing;"
"Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring:"
"There shallow draughts intoxicate the brain,"
"And drinking largely sobers us again" [Alexander Pope An Essay on Criticism]
"That one gets used to everything -"
"One gets used to that."
"The usual name for it is"
"A learning process" [Hans Magnus Enzensberger The Force of Habit]

learning

noun
Known facts, ideas, and skill that have been imparted:
Translations
مَعْرِفَه، إطِّلاع، ثَقافَه
vědomosti
lærdomviden
lærdómur
vedomosti
učenjeznanje

learning

[ˈlɜːnɪŋ]
A. N
1. (= act) → aprendizaje m
2. (= knowledge) → conocimientos mpl, saber m; (= erudition) → saber m, erudición f
man of learningsabio m, erudito m
seat of learningcentro m de estudios
B. CPD learning curve Nproceso m de aprendizaje
it's a learning curvehay que ir aprendiendo poco a poco
it's going to be a steep learning curveva a ser un proceso de aprendizaje rápido
learning difficulties NPLdificultades fpl de aprendizaje

learning

[ˈlɜːrnɪŋ]
n
(= process) → apprentissage m
the learning of English → l'apprentissage de l'anglais
language learning → l'apprentissage d'une langue
(= fund of knowledge) → érudition f
a man of great learning → un homme d'une grande érudition
modif
learning process → processus m d'apprentissage
It's part of the learning process → Cela fait partie du processus d'apprentissage.learning curve n
We're on a steep learning curve → Nous devons apprendre très vite.learning difficulties learning disabilities npl (in adults)difficultés fpl d'apprentissage; (in children)difficultés fpl scolaireslearning disability n
to have a learning disability → avoir des difficultés d'apprentissage
people with learning disabilities → les personnes ayant des difficultés d'apprentissagelearning-disabled [ˌlɜːrnɪŋdɪˈseɪbəld] adj (US)ayant des difficultés d'apprentissage
to be learning-disabled → avoir des difficultés d'apprentissage

learning

n
(= act)Lernen nt; difficulties encountered during the learning of geometry/EnglishSchwierigkeiten beim Erlernen der Geometrie/beim Englischlernen
(= erudition)Gelehrsamkeit f, → Gelehrtheit f; a man of learningein Gelehrter m; the learning contained in these volumesdas in diesen Bänden enthaltene Wissen; seat of learningStätte fder Gelehrsamkeit

learning

:
learning curve
nLernkurve f; to be on a steep learningviel dazulernen; life is a constant learningman lernt immer noch dazu
learning disability
learning-disabled

learning

[ˈlɜːnɪŋ] ncultura, erudizione f, sapere m

learn

(ləːn) past tense, past participles learned, ~learnt verb
1. to get to know. It was then that I learned that she was dead.
2. to gain knowledge or skill (in). A child is always learning; to learn French; She is learning (how) to swim.
ˈlearned (-nid) adjective
having or showing great learning. a learned professor.
ˈlearner noun
a person who is in process of learning. Be patient – I'm only a learner; (also adjective) a learner driver.
ˈlearning noun
knowledge which has been gained by learning. The professor was a man of great learning.
learner-friendly adjective
that is easy or simple for use in learning. This textbook is learner-friendly.

learn·ing

n. aprendizaje;
cognitive ______ cognitivo;
incidental ______ incidental;
latent ______ latente;
___ disabilityimpedimento en el ___;
passive ______ pasivo;
state dependent ______ dependiente del estado.

learning

n aprendizaje m
References in classic literature ?
WHILE Caedmon sang his English lays and Bede wrote his Latin books, Northumbria had grown into a center, not only of English learning, but of learning for western Europe.
After I had learned this, she assisted me in learning to spell words of three or four letters.
The instincts of an animal are different at different periods of its growth, and this fact may cause changes of behaviour which are not due to learning.
A short account of Jenny Jones, with the difficulties and discouragements which may attend young women in the pursuit of learning.
In conformity with the Act of Congress of the United States entitled, "An Act for the encouragement of Learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times herein mentioned.
But it is evident, that to live a life of rest there are some things which a man must learn and be instructed in; and that the object of this learning and this instruction centres in their acquisition: but the learning and instruction which is given for labour has for its object other things; for which reason the ancients made music a part of education; not as a thing necessary, for it is not of that nature, nor as a thing useful, as reading, in the common course of life, or for managing of a family, or for learning anything as useful in public life.
And the next thing you know, you are lined up at the bar, pouring drinks down your throat and learning the gentlemen's names and the offices which they hope to fill.
Le Grand has given in one dissertation an example of great moderation, in deviating from the temper of his religion, but in the others has left proofs that learning and honesty are often too weak to oppose prejudice.
The cause of this again is, that to learn gives the liveliest pleasure, not only to philosophers but to men in general; whose capacity, however, of learning is more limited.
The feeble fingers were never idle, and one of her pleasures was to make little things for the school children daily passing to and fro, to drop a pair of mittens from her window for a pair of purple hands, a needlebook for some small mother of many dolls, penwipers for young penmen toiling through forests of pothooks, scrapbooks for picture-loving eyes, and all manner of pleasant devices, till the reluctant climbers of the ladder of learning found their way strewn with flowers, as it were, and came to regard the gentle giver as a sort of fairy godmother, who sat above there, and showered down gifts miraculously suited to their tastes and needs.
At the age of eighteen, he had made his way through the four faculties; it seemed to the young man that life had but one sole object: learning.
While he lamented and bewailed his sores and bruises, and cried loudly for help, a neighbor ran to the well, and learning what had happened said: "Hark ye, old fellow, why, in striving to pry into what is in heaven, do you not manage to see what is on earth?