leash

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leash

 (lēsh)
n.
1.
a. A chain, rope, or strap attached to the collar or harness of an animal, especially a dog, and used to lead it or hold it in check.
b. A strap or cord attached to a harness worn by a small child, used to prevent the child from wandering off.
c. A strap, cord, or other line used to keep an object close to its user or in a designated location.
2.
a. Control or restraint: emotions kept in leash.
b. A range of allowable behavior or responsibility: a husband kept on a short leash.
3.
a. A set of three animals, such as hounds.
b. A set of three.
tr.v. leashed, leash·ing, leash·es
To restrain with or as if with a leash.

[Middle English lees, lesh, from Old French laisse, from laissier, to let go; see lease.]

leash

(liːʃ)
n
1. a line or rope used to walk or control a dog or other animal; lead
2. something resembling this in function: he kept a tight leash on his emotions.
3. (Hunting) hunting three of the same kind of animal, usually hounds, foxes, or hares
4. straining at the leash eagerly impatient to begin something
vb
(tr) to control or secure by or as if by a leash
[C13: from Old French laisse, from laissier to loose (hence, to let a dog run on a leash), ultimately from Latin laxus lax]

leash

(liʃ)
n.
1. a chain, strap, etc., for controlling or leading a dog or other animal; lead.
2. control; restraint: to keep one's temper in leash.
3. a brace and a half, as of foxes or hounds; set of three animals.
v.t.
4. to secure or control by or as if by a leash.
5. to bind together by or as if by a leash; connect; link; associate.
Idioms:
strain at the leash, to struggle against constraints.
[1250–1300; Middle English lesh, variant of lece, lese < Old French laisse]

Leash

 Sporting, a brace and a half; a tierce, i.e., ‘three’. See also harl.
Examples: leash of armies, 1705; of bucks, 1624; of days, 1609; of deer; of foxes, 1838; of greyhound, 1450; of hares, 1750; of hawks, 1486; of hounds, 1320; of kings, 1859; of languages, 1663; of partridges; of ratches, 1526; of snipe; of teal, 1826; of trout, 1882.

leash


Past participle: leashed
Gerund: leashing

Imperative
leash
leash
Present
I leash
you leash
he/she/it leashes
we leash
you leash
they leash
Preterite
I leashed
you leashed
he/she/it leashed
we leashed
you leashed
they leashed
Present Continuous
I am leashing
you are leashing
he/she/it is leashing
we are leashing
you are leashing
they are leashing
Present Perfect
I have leashed
you have leashed
he/she/it has leashed
we have leashed
you have leashed
they have leashed
Past Continuous
I was leashing
you were leashing
he/she/it was leashing
we were leashing
you were leashing
they were leashing
Past Perfect
I had leashed
you had leashed
he/she/it had leashed
we had leashed
you had leashed
they had leashed
Future
I will leash
you will leash
he/she/it will leash
we will leash
you will leash
they will leash
Future Perfect
I will have leashed
you will have leashed
he/she/it will have leashed
we will have leashed
you will have leashed
they will have leashed
Future Continuous
I will be leashing
you will be leashing
he/she/it will be leashing
we will be leashing
you will be leashing
they will be leashing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been leashing
you have been leashing
he/she/it has been leashing
we have been leashing
you have been leashing
they have been leashing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been leashing
you will have been leashing
he/she/it will have been leashing
we will have been leashing
you will have been leashing
they will have been leashing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been leashing
you had been leashing
he/she/it had been leashing
we had been leashing
you had been leashing
they had been leashing
Conditional
I would leash
you would leash
he/she/it would leash
we would leash
you would leash
they would leash
Past Conditional
I would have leashed
you would have leashed
he/she/it would have leashed
we would have leashed
you would have leashed
they would have leashed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.leash - restraint consisting of a rope (or light chain) used to restrain an animalleash - restraint consisting of a rope (or light chain) used to restrain an animal
constraint, restraint - a device that retards something's motion; "the car did not have proper restraints fitted"
2.leash - the cardinal number that is the sum of one and one and oneleash - the cardinal number that is the sum of one and one and one
digit, figure - one of the elements that collectively form a system of numeration; "0 and 1 are digits"
3.leash - a figurative restraint; "asked for a collar on program trading in the stock market"; "kept a tight leash on his emotions"; "he's always gotten a long leash"
restraint - the act of controlling by restraining someone or something; "the unlawful restraint of trade"
Verb1.leash - fasten with a rope; "rope the bag securely"
tie, bind - fasten or secure with a rope, string, or cord; "They tied their victim to the chair"

leash

noun
1. lead, line, restraint, cord, rein, tether All dogs should be on a leash.
2. restraint, hold, control, check, curb They have kept the company on a tight leash.
verb
1. tether, control, secure, restrain, tie up, hold back, fasten Make sure your dog is leashed and muzzled.
straining at the leash impatient, eager, restless, chafing There are plenty of youngsters straining at the leash to take their place.

leash

verb
To restrict the activity or free movement of:
Informal: hog-tie.
noun
An instrument or means of restraining:
Translations
رباط عُنْق الكَلْب
vodítko
hundesnor
talutushihna
póráz
ól, band
pasaitas
pavadasaitesiksna
vrvica
koppel
tasma kayışızinciri

leash

[liːʃ] Ncorrea f, traílla f
see also strain 1 C

leash

[ˈliːʃ] nlaisse f
to be on a leash [dog] → être en laisse

leash

nLeine f; on a leashan der Leine; to give somebody a longer leash (esp US fig) → jdm mehr Freiheit geben ? also strain1

leash

[liːʃ] nguinzaglio
on a leash → al guinzaglio

leash

(liːʃ) noun
a strip of leather or piece of chain attached to a collar round its neck by which a dog etc is held.
References in classic literature ?
At this alarm, the hounds of Natty rushed out of their bark kennel, and commenced their long, piteous howls, leaping about as if half frantic, though restrained by the leashes of buckskin by which they were fastened.
Here, then, it was proper to begin to cast loose those leashes of hardy trappers, that are detached from trading parties, in the very heart of the wilderness.
Three or four mounted horsemen were curvetting about, on the space in front of the house; and one or two leashes of strange dogs were struggling with the negroes who held them, baying and barking at each other.
Humans have known that dogs are good boys and girls for thousands of years, based on ancient rock carvings in Saudi Arabia that show people holding dogs on leashes and using them while hunting.
A Wonderkul spokesperson was quoted as saying, "We are so excited to share these amazing leashes with dog owners everywhere.
If good fences make good neighbors, leashes can help make good dog walkers
City of Eugene rules have long required dog owners to keep their pets on leashes in parks.
extension leashes add to the problem because they encourage dogs to pull and to gain speed before they get to the end of the line.
debuts a completely biodegradable pet bed and crate pad, as well as line of Dog Gone Smart nanotechnology-based collars, leashes and harnesses.
Leashes were placed in prominent places around the city centre such as the Quayside, Strawberry Place, and the Newcastle University.
He said dogs are banned from city parks, even on leashes, but added that dogs are often seen being walked by their owners in Elm Park.