leat

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Related to leats: Keats, cleats

leat

(liːt)
n
Brit a trench or ditch that conveys water to a mill wheel
[Old English -gelǣt (as in wætergelǣt water channel), from let1]
References in periodicals archive ?
Ancient walls, reaves, tracks, terraces, tin mining gorges, leats...
How would it have joyed brave Talbot (the terror of the French) to thinke that after he had lyne two hundred yeares in his Tombe, hee should triumphe againe on the Stage, and have his bones newe embalmed with the teares of ten thousand spectators at leats, (at severall times) who, in the Tragedian that represents his person, imagine they behold him fresh bleeding!
Those add to at leats 56 residents from the villages of Tal Hermez and Tal Shamiram in the surrounding of Tal Tamr town who were captured by ISIS a day before.
An estimated some 3,300 people nationwide were detained during four days of protests and at leats 1,300 people were injured, according to the Turkish Human Rights Association.
The 30 megawatt station on the banks of the Dwyryd Estuary has been operating for 84 years and collects its water from a series of rivers, 'leats' and streams that feed into Trawsfynydd lake.
Other remains include early patch workings and scourings, ironstone, settlement sites and elements of the Dowlais Free Drainage System, an arrangement of leats and reservoirs which channelled water to power the ironworks.
Leats, feeders ponds and primitive hydroelectric technology, which formed part of the drainage system of the Cyfarthfa Ironworks, are also still in existence.
A bank is entitled to tax incentive if at leats 40% of their share is held by the public.
Water-mills were powered by leats of water carried down oak-lined shoots to drive horizontal wheels attached to lava millstones, the lava imported from the Continent because of its lightness and hardness.
To date at leats six human BMPs have demonstrated osteogenic activity: BMP-2, 4, 5, 6, 7 (also referred to as osteogenic protein [OP-1]) and 8 (OP-2) (Wozney, 1993; Cook et al., 2005).
Restoration work has been carried out on miles of leats ( stone-lined channels in the ground to funnel the water ( and launders, which are wooden versions above ground.