legacy

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leg·a·cy

 (lĕg′ə-sē)
n. pl. leg·a·cies
1. Money or property given to another by will.
2. Something handed down from an ancestor or a predecessor or from the past: a legacy of religious freedom. See Synonyms at heritage.
3. An individual who is either an applicant to an educational institution or a matriculated student and is the child of an alumna or alumnus.
adj.
Retained under an obsolescent or discarded system, chiefly for purposes of reference: legacy files in the old email system.

[Middle English legacie, office of a deputy, from Old French, from Medieval Latin lēgātia, from Latin lēgātus, past participle of lēgāre, to depute, bequeath; see leg- in Indo-European roots.]

legacy

(ˈlɛɡəsɪ)
n, pl -cies
1. (Law) a gift by will, esp of money or personal property
2. (Law) something handed down or received from an ancestor or predecessor
3. (Computer Science) (modifier) surviving computer systems, hardware, or software: legacy network; legacy application.
[C14 (meaning: office of a legate), C15 (meaning: bequest): from Medieval Latin lēgātia commission; see legate]

leg•a•cy

(ˈlɛg ə si)

n., pl. -cies,
adj. n.
1. (in a will) a gift of property, esp. personal property, as money; bequest.
2. anything handed down from the past, as from an ancestor or predecessor.
3. Obs. the office, function, or commission of a legate.
4. a student at or applicant to a college that was attended by his or her parent.
adj.
5. of or pertaining to old or outdated computer hardware, software, or data that, while still functional, does not work well with up-to-date systems.
[1325–75; Middle English legacie office of a deputy or legate < Medieval Latin lēgātia. See legate, -acy]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.legacy - (law) a gift of personal property by will
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
inheritance, heritage - that which is inherited; a title or property or estate that passes by law to the heir on the death of the owner
gift - something acquired without compensation

legacy

noun
1. bequest, inheritance, endowment, gift, estate, devise (Law), heirloom You could make a real difference to someone's life by leaving them a generous legacy.
2. heritage, tradition, inheritance, throwback, birthright, patrimony the `fight or flight syndrome' is a legacy from the days of our ancestors
3. repercussion, result, fruit, consequences, aftermath a programme to overcome the legacy of inequality created by Apartheid

legacy

noun
1. Any special privilege accorded a firstborn:
2. Something immaterial, as a style or philosophy, that is passed from one generation to another:
Translations
ميراث
odkaz
arv
arfur
mantojumsnovēlējums
kalıtmiras

legacy

[ˈlegəsɪ] Nlegado m (fig) → legado m, herencia f
this inflation is a legacy of the previous governmentesta inflación es un legado del gobierno anterior

legacy

[ˈlɛgəsi] n
(fig)héritage m
the legacy of Colonialism → l'héritage du colonialisme
the legacy of inequality and injustice created by Apartheid → l'héritage d'inégalité et d'injustice laissé par l'apartheid
(in will)héritage m, legs m
to leave sb a legacy → faire un legs à qn, laisser un héritage à qn

legacy

n (lit, fig)Erbschaft f, → Vermächtnis nt; (fig also)Erbe nt; (fig pej)Hinterlassenschaft f; to leave somebody a legacy of something (fig)jdm etw hinterlassen; our legacy to future generations must not be a polluted worldwir dürfen den zukünftigen Generationen keine verschmutzte Welt hinterlassen; the tragedy left a legacy of bitternessdie Tragödie hinterließ Bitterkeit

legacy

[ˈlɛgəsɪ] neredità f inv (fig) → retaggio

legacy

(ˈlegəsi) plural ˈlegacies noun
something left in a will by someone who has died. He was left a legacy by his great-aunt.
References in classic literature ?
'His will leaves legacies to the surviving old servants of the family.
Solomon found time to reflect that Jonah was undeserving, and Jonah to abuse Solomon as greedy; Jane, the elder sister, held that Martha's children ought not to expect so much as the young Waules; and Martha, more lax on the subject of primogeniture, was sorry to think that Jane was so "having." These nearest of kin were naturally impressed with the unreasonableness of expectations in cousins and second cousins, and used their arithmetic in reckoning the large sums that small legacies might mount to, if there were too many of them.
I should be all the better pleased if he'd left lots of small legacies. They may be uncommonly useful to fellows in a small way."
The second will revoked everything except the legacies to the low persons before mentioned (some alterations in these being the occasion of the codicil), and the bequest of all the land lying in Lowick parish with all the stock and household furniture, to Joshua Rigg.
Rigg in conversation: there was no knowing how many pairs of legs the new proprietor might require hose for, and profits were more to be relied on than legacies. Also, the mercer, as a second cousin, was dispassionate enough to feel curiosity.
Neither Thwackum nor Square were much better satisfied with their legacies. Though they breathed not their resentment so loud, yet from the discontent which appeared in their countenances, as well as from the following dialogue, we collect that no great pleasure reigned in their minds.
In the matter of wills, personal qualities were subordinate to the great fundamental fact of blood; and to be determined in the distribution of your property by caprice, and not make your legacies bear a direct ratio to degrees of kinship, was a prospective disgrace that would have embittered her life.
They focus on helping people build their legacies and manage the complexities of wealth.
In this way, legacies are personal and relational summations of our unique histories, current activities, and hopes for the future (Boles & Berbary, 2013).
Its subject is legacies and its objective is to know who deserves what and how much of the legacies while legacy is what is left behind somebody of money or property after his death (Al Shafe'e, 1990).
One question that arises upon evaluation of bid books involves the sustainability of legacies over time.
They died before their legacies were fulfilled, but they will be forever revered for their efforts.