legation


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le·ga·tion

 (lĭ-gā′shən)
n.
1. The act of sending a legate.
2.
a. A diplomatic mission in a foreign country ranking below an embassy.
b. The diplomatic minister and staff of such a mission.
c. The premises occupied by such a mission.

le·ga′tion·ar·y adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

legation

(lɪˈɡeɪʃən)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a diplomatic mission headed by a minister
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the official residence and office of a diplomatic minister
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the act of sending forth a diplomatic envoy
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the mission or business of a diplomatic envoy
5. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the rank or office of a legate
[C15: from Latin lēgātiō, from lēgātus legate]
leˈgationary adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

le•ga•tion

(lɪˈgeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. a diplomatic minister and staff in a foreign mission.
2. the official headquarters of a diplomatic minister.
3. the office or position of a legate; mission.
[1425–75; late Middle English < Latin lēgātiō embassy. See legate, -tion]
le•ga′tion•ar′y, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Legation

 
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.legation - the post or office of legatelegation - the post or office of legate  
berth, billet, post, situation, position, office, place, spot - a job in an organization; "he occupied a post in the treasury"
2.legation - a permanent diplomatic mission headed by a minister
diplomatic mission - a mission serving diplomatic ends
legate, official emissary - a member of a legation
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

legation

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

legation

noun
A diplomatic office or headquarters in a foreign country:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
مُفَوَّضِيَّه
vyslanectví
gesandtskablegation
követség
sendiráî
pasiuntinybė
diplomātiskā misija
vyslanectvo
elçiliktemsilcilik

legation

[lɪˈgeɪʃən] Nlegación f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

legation

[lɪˈgeɪʃən] nlégation f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

legation

n (= diplomats)Gesandtschaft f, → Vertretung f; (= building)Gesandtschaftsgebäude nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

legation

[lɪˈgeɪʃn] nlegazione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

legation

(liˈgeiʃən) noun
(the headquarters of) an official group of people acting on behalf of the government of their own country etc in another country.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Coming solely from the Ottomans, it might have signified only Ottoman hatred of Christians, and a vulgar ignorance as to genteel methods of expressing it; but coming from the Christianized, educated, politic British legation, it simply intimated that we were a sort of gentlemen and ladies who would bear watching!
After leaving college he became Private Secretary to Lord Binkie, and was then appointed Attache to the Legation at Pumpernickel, which post he filled with perfect honour, and brought home despatches, consisting of Strasburg pie, to the Foreign Minister of the day.
He had been appointed to the secretaryship of the German legation at Washington and in these first days of the autumn was about to take possession of his post.
This time there can be no doubt: it was modesty that caused the secretary of legation, in placing himself, to turn this portion of his seat outward, away from the eyes of his companions--to present it to the balustrade of the deck.
It seemed to him strange that such a nice-looking girl--for her appearance was really charming--should endeavour by arts so flagrant to work upon the quiet dignity of a secretary of legation. At last it stood out that she was trying to look round a corner, as it were--trying to see what was written on the back of his chair.
Pursuing his inquiries, Clennam found that the Gowan family were a very distant ramification of the Barnacles; and that the paternal Gowan, originally attached to a legation abroad, had been pensioned off as a Commissioner of nothing particular somewhere or other, and had died at his post with his drawn salary in his hand, nobly defending it to the last extremity.
Shortly after this his older brother, Gansevoort Melville, sailed for England as secretary of legation to Ambassador McLane, and the manuscript was intrusted to Gansevoort for submission to John Murray.
He was the doctor of our Legation and, of course, of the Consulate, too.
"Oh, I see; you want to go to court," said Newman, vaguely conjecturing that she might wish him to appeal to the United States legation to smooth her way to the imperial halls.
But at the "Trois Couronnes," it must be added, there are other features that are much at variance with these suggestions: neat German waiters, who look like secretaries of legation; Russian princesses sitting in the garden; little Polish boys walking about held by the hand, with their governors; a view of the sunny crest of the Dent du Midi and the picturesque towers of the Castle of Chillon.
I scarcely know how to describe this person, who, to my simple eyes, had the appearance of a colonel of the late Royal Guards, or, at least, of an attache of one of the northern legations. He was dressed in the height of the latest fashion, as well as he knew how to be; wore terrible moustaches, and had a rare provision of rings, eye- glasses, watch-guards, chains, &c.
The first stop is Beit Al Balad, founded in the early 20th century to serve as the headquarters of the British legation in Jeddah for a period between 1915 and the 1930s.