legator


Also found in: Legal.

le·ga·tor

 (lĭ-gā′tər)
n.
One that makes a will; a testator.

[Latin lēgātor, from lēgāre, to bequeath; see legacy.]

legator

(ˌlɛɡəˈtɔː)
n
(Law) a person who gives a legacy or makes a bequest
[C17: from Latin, from lēgāre to bequeath; see legate]
ˌlegaˈtorial adj
References in periodicals archive ?
Fortunate inheritor whose legator's name Now burns his lip like a dreadful spell The poet is barely impressed by Obasanjo's pretense of detachment from the circumstances that 'foisted' power on him and questions the sort of nation such a character could generate:
(69) Her argument revolves around the decision of Legator McKenna Inc.
For example, if I have a legal claim on an inheritance, it is because the legator has left me a bequest in his will.
He said: "The legator wanted it to be used in an acquisition and we've been working with the family for some time to find an acquisition that they were happy with.
More recent studies, however, suggest health effects in communities chronically exposed to low environmental hydrogen sulfide levels (Bates, Garrett, Graham, & Read, 1997, 1998; Bates, Garrett, & Shoemack, 2002; Durand & Wilson, 2006; Hansell & Oppenheimer, 2004; Legator, Singleton, Morris, & Philips, 2001).
Examples of how specific legacies have been used can be included in promotional material verifying money is used thoughtfully and in a manner which meets the legator's wishes or interests.
Legator, "Mercury, lead, and zinc in baby teeth of children with autism versus controls," Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health--Part A: Current Issues, vol.
[68.] Adams JB, Romdalvik J, Ramanujam VM, Legator MS (2007) Mercury, lead, and zinc in baby teeth of children with autism versus controls.
Marvin Legator to do a simple survey study in the city of Port Arthur.