leniency


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le·ni·en·cy

 (lē′nē-ən-sē, lēn′yən-)
n. pl. le·ni·en·cies
1. The condition or quality of being lenient. See Synonyms at mercy.
2. A lenient act.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.leniency - mercifulness as a consequence of being lenient or tolerantleniency - mercifulness as a consequence of being lenient or tolerant
mercifulness, mercy - a disposition to be kind and forgiving; "in those days a wife had to depend on the mercifulness of her husband"
2.leniency - a disposition to yield to the wishes of someone; "too much indulgence spoils a child"
permissiveness, tolerance - a disposition to allow freedom of choice and behavior
softness - a disposition to be lenient in judging others; "softness is not something permitted of good leaders"
3.leniency - lightening a penalty or excusing from a chore by judges or parents or teachers
tolerance - the act of tolerating something
mercy, clemency, mercifulness - leniency and compassion shown toward offenders by a person or agency charged with administering justice; "he threw himself on the mercy of the court"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

leniency

lenience
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

leniency

noun
1. Kind, forgiving, or compassionate treatment of or disposition toward others:
2. Forbearing or lenient treatment:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
تَساهُل، تَعاطُف
linkind, mildi
leniência

leniency

[ˈliːniənsi] n [sentence, punishment] → légèreté f; [person] → indulgence f
his parents' leniency towards him → l'indulgence de ses parents à son égard
to show leniency → faire preuve d'indulgence
to plead for leniency [convicted criminal] → en appeler à la clémence des juges
She wrote to the judge pleading for leniency → Elle écrivit au juge, en appelant à sa clémence.
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

lenient

(ˈliːniənt) adjective
merciful or punishing only lightly. You are much too lenient with wrongdoers.
ˈleniently adverb
ˈlenience, ˈleniency noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
"Listen, then, O Jeddak, and judge us with leniency. We followed the two slaves to the apartments of O-Mai the Cruel.
He thought he had the demonstration of facts observed through years by his own eyes, which gave no warning of their imperfection, that Maggie's nature was utterly untrustworthy, and too strongly marked with evil tendencies to be safely treated with leniency. He would act on that demonstration at any cost; but the thought of it made his days bitter to him.
That would be a difficult thing to explain to Astok; but some leniency might be expected could they carry the Prince of Helium to their master instead.
I will appeal to the law too; but when you have gone too far to recede, do not sue to me for leniency, when the power will have passed into other hands; and do not say I plunged you down the gulf into which you rushed, yourself.'
To work this sportive vein still further, Mr Brass, by his counsel, moved in arrest of judgment that he had been led to criminate himself, by assurances of safety and promises of pardon, and claimed the leniency which the law extends to such confiding natures as are thus deluded.
Perry was standing close behind Ja, and I knew that this merciful action was prompted, perhaps commanded, by the old man; for no Pellucidarian would have thought of showing leniency to a defeated foe.
The general leniency of the judicial procedure here, and the utter absence of all repressive measures, are a scandal to Europe.
Yet he had a reputation for kindness and charity on the country-side, and was noted for the leniency of his sentences from the bench.
The only material outcome of his period of public favor was an appointment as internal revenue collector, an unpopular and uncongenial office which he accepted with reluctance and exercised with leniency. It required him to occupy much of his time in riding about the country, and contributed to his final failure as a farmer.
This is a leniency, Sir, which I hope you will remember.'
And I was wondering how much of his leniency was owing to the fact that Raffles had not forgotten it either, when he stopped and stood over my chair once more.
Following the leniency trend set by the United States, most Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries, (129) and more than fifty antitrust jurisdictions around the world, have implemented similar policies to help combat collusion.