lernaean

lernaean

(lɜːˈniːən)
adj
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth relating to Lerna, the swamp or lake near Argos in which dwelt the Hydra which Hercules slew
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In Greek mythology, the Lernaean Hydra was an ancient nameless serpent like chthonic water beast (as its name evinces) that possessed many heads and for each head cut off it grew two more and poisonous breath so virulent even her tracks were deadly.
Power in unison, as it were, instead of fighting this Lernaean Hydra one at a time.
The Sangh Parivar is like the proverbial Lernaean Hydra, the many-headed serpent of Greek mythology.
Moreover, Castoriadis points out quite emphatically that modern science produces more enigmas than solutions: "Solving a problem implies always the creation of other problems, every Lernaean Hydras' severed head makes many germinate, while our ultimate questions do not diminish as time goes by.
Further, once a file or URL is removed in response to a takedown notice, it may immediately pop right back up in multiple new locations -- not unlike a Lernaean Hydra that grows back two heads for every one that is cut off.
In it, Hercules battles the multiheaded Lernaean hydra water monster, the behemoth Erymanthian boar and the massive Nemean lion.
54) David Levin, 'Slaying of the Lernaean Hydra in Victoria' [2008] (32) BDPS News 12, 16.
By conventional view, Heracles had twelve labors, and these labors occurred in the following order: 1) Nemean Lion; 2) Lernaean Hydra; 3) Ceryneian Hind; 4) Erymanthian Boar; 5) Stables of Augeias; 6) Stymphalian Birds; 7) Cretan Bull; 8) Mares of Diomedes; 9) Hippolyte's Girdle; 10) Cattle of Geryon; 11) Apples of the Hesperides; 12) Capture of Cerberus.
For example, in both OEdipus and the Sphinx and Hercules and the Lernaean Hydra, good challenges evil with such fixity of gaze that the space between the contenders is electrically charged and palpable.
In Greek mythology, Hydra was a many-headed water snake that lived in the Lernaean marshes of Argolis.
The early captains of English industry from the seventeenth to the early nineteenth centuries went back to the Classical Greek myth of Heracles' killing the many-headed Lernaean Hydra to explain the threat of the revolutionary proletariat to the established order.
Irenaeus cleverly parodied their teachings, excoriated them as "emissaries of Satan," compared their "multitudes" to "mushrooms from the ground" and denounced their various teachings "as from the Lernaean Hydra, a many-headed wild beast.