lesser yellowlegs


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Related to lesser yellowlegs: greater yellowlegs

yel•low•legs

(ˈyɛl oʊˌlɛgz)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
either of two large New World sandpipers having yellow legs, Tringa melanoleuca (greater yellowlegs) or T. flavipes (lesser yellowlegs).
[1765–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lesser yellowlegs - a variety of yellowlegslesser yellowlegs - a variety of yellowlegs    
yellowlegs - either of two North American shorebird with yellow legs
References in periodicals archive ?
A Lesser Yellowlegs was reported near Flintshire Bridge last Friday, two Great White Egrets are at Shotton Steelworks and two Mediterranean Gulls on the Glaslyn.
Some species considered riparian/wetland specialists (e.g., Lesser Yellowlegs Tringa flavipes, Blackpoll Warbler Setophaga striata) were also associated with this habitat type in combination with other habitats.
Painted snipe, Eurasian woodcock, Kittlitz's plover have been observed and even buff-breasted sandpiper, pectoral sandpiper, lesser yellowlegs and Wilson's phalarope are on the national checklist.
At RSPB Malltraeth, a glossy ibis is feeding in the wetland channels, while the lesser yellowlegs is in its fifth week on the Alaw estuary, Llanfachraeth.
Fishermen with a good sense of curiosity can encounter and enjoy many other unique shorebirds, as well, including oyster catchers, black-bellied plovers, short-billed and long-billed dowitchers, red knots, Hudsonian godwits, whimbrels, white-rumped sandpipers, phalaropes, willets and lesser yellowlegs. They're all a reason I often bring binoculars along to "hunt" with when the fishing's slow and I want some exciting action.
phaeopus), semipalmated plovers (Charadrius semipalmatus), and greater yellowlegs (Tringa melanoleuca) were rare, while snowy plovers (Charadrius alexandrinus) and lesser yellowlegs (Tringa fiavipes) were sporadic.
A WHITE-winged Black Tern from Eastern Europe and Lesser Yellowlegs from North America drew crowds to Cantley, Norfolk.
The armies of shorebirds--greater and lesser yellowlegs, long-billed and short-billed dowitchers, willet, sandpipers, whimbrels, curlews, godwits, dunlins, snipes--have worked their way far to the north, foraging by day and traveling by night.
Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs and Semipalmated, Western, Least, White-rumped, and Stilt Sandpipers, and Common Snipe were common to abundant shorebird species.