letter-quality

let·ter-qual·i·ty

(lĕt′ər-kwŏl′ĭ-tē)
adj.
Of or producing clear, highly readable, sharply defined printed characters: a letter-quality computer printer.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

let′ter-qual`i•ty



adj.
designating or producing type equal in sharpness and resolution to that produced by an electric typewriter: a letter-quality computer printer. Abbr.: LQ
[1975–80]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The original submission of a manuscript for review must be primed on a letter-quality primer with double spacing throughout on nonerasable 8-1/2- by 11-inch paper.
At the end of the meeting, he asked if he could use a letter-quality printer to print them."
It is becoming the standard for documentation on the Web because it allows you to download and print out letter-quality documents.
Letter-quality computer printing is recommended for ease in targeting resumes to employers.
The printer comes with four scalable and five letter-quality fonts, prints 2.5 pages per minute and will hold up to 100 sheets.
The simplest models combine a small computer with a floppydisc drive, a letter-quality printer, a keyboard, and a video monitor into a single desktop unit.
Some of the more green laser printer features to look for include the ability to print drafts using half the toner required for letter-quality text and manufacturer's willingness to accept spent toner cartridges (both Apple and Hewlett-Packard do).
Letter-quality speeds range from 150 to 180 characters per second, and many of the new generation dot-matrix printers come with six different typefaces.
Several offer draft, near letter-quality and presentation level output.
Until recently, a type of printer referred to as "letter-quality" was preferred by many accounting firms, but that is virtually a thing of the past.