levator

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Related to levator muscle: Levator ani muscle, Levator scapulae muscle

le·va·tor

 (lə-vā′tər)
n. pl. lev·a·to·res (lĕv′ə-tôr′ēz)
1. Anatomy A muscle that raises a bodily part.
2. A surgical instrument for lifting the depressed fragments of a fractured skull.

[New Latin, from Medieval Latin levātor, one that raises, from Latin levāre, to raise; see lever.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

levator

(lɪˈveɪtə; -tɔː)
n
1. (Anatomy) anatomy any of various muscles that raise a part of the body
2. (Surgery) surgery an instrument for elevating a part or structure
[C17: New Latin, from Latin levāre to raise]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

le•va•tor

(lɪˈveɪ tər, -tɔr)

n., pl. lev•a•to•res (ˌlɛv əˈtɔr iz, -ˈtoʊr-)
1. a muscle that raises a part of the body. Compare depressor.
2. a surgical instrument used to raise a depressed part of the skull.
[1605–15; < New Latin; compare Medieval Latin levātor one who raises recruits < Latin levāre to raise]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.levator - a muscle that serves to lift some body part (as the eyelid or lip)
muscle, musculus - one of the contractile organs of the body
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

le·va·tor

1. n. elevador, músculo que eleva o levanta una parte;
2. instrumento quirúrgico para levantar una depresión en una fractura del cráneo.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
A similar muscular structure was described by del Sol & Olave (2005), the "levator muscle of the tendon of latissimus dorsi muscle", these fusiform fascicle extends from the coracoid process to the superior part of the tendon of the cited muscle.
They breach the levator muscle through their courses and are related with pelvic infections (Fig.
It is self-evident that levator avulsion is associated with more advanced prolapse, but after controlling for potential confounders, levator muscle avulsion had a persisting impact on pessary expulsion (odds ratio 3.18; p<0.01).
Dave et al [6] described a novel technique, The Neutral Sagittal anorectoplasty or NSARP as an extension of PSARP, which preserves both a perineal skin bridge between the neoanus and the posterior fourchette and the levator muscle. Leaving the perineal skin bridge and the levator muscle intact could be important for the both the aspects of perineal wound-healing and functional outcome.
For mild-to-moderate ptosis with levator function over 5 mm, various surgical procedures can be applied, such as the Muller muscle conjunctival resection, shortening of the levator palpebrae, or levator muscle advancement.
Typical clinical findings in aponeurotic ptosis may include good levator muscle function, deep upper eyelid sulcus, and upper eyelid dermatochalasis [11].
To measure the function of the levator muscle, the patient is asked to gaze from below upwards while keeping the eyebrows stable with compression.
Ptosis is relatively commonplace in the elderly population, particularly after intraocular surgery; this is probably due to the stretching or disruption of the levator muscle when the eyelid is retracted with a speculum during surgery.
The levator muscle's function has to be respected; an inadequate dynamic function can compromise the visual axis of the patient; good eyelid closure is necessary to prevent exposure keratopathy due to lagophtalmos.
(101) In cases of ptosis severe enough to interfere with vision, the use of 0.5% apraclonidine ophthalmic drops to enhance Muller muscle function may be beneficial the levator muscle function returns.
[1] Ptosis may be congenital wherein the levator muscle is dystrophic, or it may be associated with Marcus Gunn jaw-winking and neurogenic or myogenic causes such as third nerve palsy, blepharophimosis syndrome, myasthenia gravis, and so on.

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