level of significance

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level of significance

n. pl. levels of significance
The probability of a false rejection of the null hypothesis in a statistical test. Also called significance level.
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Then, the tables (2-dimensional on a page) can be presented with different levels of significance, say 0.
If policymakers are more concerned with Type II errors (false negatives), then an appropriate policy prescription appeals to higher levels of significance as the relevant thresholds.
The results show strong levels of reliability between questions at levels of significance which are statistically significant (see Tables 1 and 2).
1] = 0 with different levels of significance under the null hypothesis of correctly specified models, assuming that the factors and returns are generated from a multivariate normal distribution.
As a final check of the variables stepwise regression was run on all of the variables at the 5% and 10% levels of significance (Table 4).
007 Within groups (*) Since the levels of significance equal to or less than 0.
The correlations of the other variables, namely types of barriers on the market, price of a product/ service and a company's main objective, with the "form of property" are statistically insignificant, higher "p-values" and levels of Significance F being obtained.
Levels of significance of 1%, 5% and 10% were used to validate the study.
It is simultaneously an historic event that unfolded once in a specific time and location, yet its ramifications exceed the boundaries of time and continue to hold far-reaching, indeed cosmic, levels of significance," he said.
In contrast, 12 of the inspection findings, or less than 1 percent, were of the highest levels of significance to safety.
One of the latter, titled "Inszenieren ist Lieben" (To Stage Is to Love; 1991), has become a canonical document for contemporary curating, spelling out a program of setting energies free and emphasizing nonverbal levels of significance inherent in the works on display.
The American sculptor Augustus Saint-Gauden was a strong force in the development of America's cultural life, changing the public perception of civic sculpture and revitalizing it in the United States, raising sculpture to new levels of significance in the late 19th century.