lexical


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lex·i·cal

 (lĕk′sĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. Of or relating to the vocabulary, words, or morphemes of a language.
2. Of or relating to lexicography or a lexicon.


lex′i·cal′i·ty (-kăl′ĭ-tē) n.
lex′i·cal·ly adv.

lexical

(ˈlɛksɪkəl)
adj
1. (Linguistics) of or relating to items of vocabulary in a language
2. (Linguistics) of or relating to a lexicon
lexicality n
ˈlexically adv

lex•i•cal

(ˈlɛk sɪ kəl)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to the words or vocabulary of a language, esp. as distinguished from its grammatical and syntactic aspects.
2. of, pertaining to, or of the nature of a lexicon.
[1830–40]
lex`i•cal′i•ty, n.
lex′i•cal•ly, adv.

lexical

Relating to the vocabulary of a language.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.lexical - of or relating to words; "lexical decision task"
2.lexical - of or relating to dictionaries
Translations
lexikální
lexikailexikálisszókészleti
leksinisžodyninis

lexical

[ˈleksɪkəl] ADJléxico

lexical

[ˈlɛksɪkəl] adjlexical(e)

lexical

adjlexikalisch

lexical

[ˈlɛksɪkl] adjlessicale

lex·i·cal

a. léxico-a, rel. al vocabulario.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among their topics are characteristics of lexical conventionalization in Chinese, botany meets lexicology: the relationship between experiential salience and lexical diversity, the use of cognitive state verbs in narratives of school-age Cantonese-speaking children with and without language impairment, lexical variation of ideophones in Chinese classics: their implications in embodiment and migration, and textual patterns of modern western paintings: a cognitive multimodal exploration.
Abandoned at the Supreme Court for decades, lexical ordering
prefers to flatly exclude sources, the lexical ordering of sources lacks
In the two last decades many studies on word recognition have focused on the psychological mechanisms allowing the selection of one lexical representation among a variable number of partially similar words (Andrews, 1997; Grainger, 1992; Marcet & Perea, 2017; Perea & Rosa, 2000).
Most studies of lexical stress have been carried out on the perception of speech (although things and changing, e.g., Sulpizio, Spinelli, & Burani, 2015) and have progressed in two directions (Cutler, 1986).
The process of reading has several components, including the lexical component and the semantic component (Gazzaniga, Ivry, & Mangun, 2002).
Lexical decision tasks are used to evaluate lexical access and lexical formation.
One of the language patterns which is quite commonly observed is that of lexical bundles.
This influence often manifests itself in lexical errors in oral and written production which are seemingly difficult for the learner to eradicate.
When used in an institutionalized way, email writing may be characterized by the use of frequently recurring multiword lexical units, or lexical bundles, and readers may also expect to encounter certain specific structures and language forms.
Lexical availability is a dimension of a speaker's lexical competence inasmuch as it is understood "as the vocabulary flow usable in a given communicative situation" (Lopez Morales, 2014: 3).
While most researchers agree that lexical proficiency is an important component of second language (L2) language competence and academic achievement (Alderson, 2005; Daller, Van Hout, & Treffers-Daller, 2003; Laufer, 1992), the construct of lexical proficiency itself is still poorly understood and the field of L2 research lacks a unified theory of vocabulary acquisition (David, 2008; Schmitt, 2010).