lexicographic


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lex·i·cog·ra·phy

 (lĕk′sĭ-kŏg′rə-fē)
n.
The process or work of writing, editing, or compiling a dictionary.


lex′i·co·graph′ic (-kə-grăf′ĭk), lex′i·co·graph′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
lex′i·co·graph′i·cal·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.lexicographic - of or relating to lexicography
Translations
lexikográfiai

lexicographic(al)

References in periodicals archive ?
77-79) had noted two important requirements from the perspective of linguistic theory for any serious modern effort at biblical philology: first, a contextual approach to lexicographic matters based on the appreciation of sentences rather than words as the primary bearers of meaning; second, the concomitant development of a theory of translation.
(1999) suggest that as far as articles in economics are concerned, there is an overwhelming tendency for the ordering to be lexicographic rather than on the basis of relative contributions.
Salles), (9) Lexicographic Utility and Orderings (J.
A method that turns out to be useful in practice is one we call lexicographic atom orderings: Let ??
Wilde and Rajopadhye [1995] originally presented the following strategy for compiling an ALPHA program:(1) (i) allocate enough memory for the bounding box of the domain of each variable; (ii) visit the index points in the domains of the output variable(s) in any order (say lexicographic); and (iii) at each point, use demand-driven evaluation, suspending and recursively evaluating any unevaluated arguments if necessary.
That's lexicographic news, but I have learned never to put the story in the lede."
To be precise, the linear subsystems into which G(z) = 0 decomposes, whether solvable or unsolvable, can be uniquely characterized by two lexicographic vectors.
The second phase involves a maximizing or lexicographic decision rule for selecting an alternative from the subset of "surviving" alternatives.
This is not to detract from the positive contributions of this study, such as the lexicographic survey of the term bourgeois, or from its delights, especially the discussion of dress as representive of bourgeois culture and the appendix, brief biographies of 49 Sainte Marie women interviewed, focusing on their views of the qualities and defects of their education.
Professor Willinsky makes it seem as if her Mount Royal were by deliberate choice selected as the 'Leading Title' by the editors of the dictionary, whereas it is probable that one of the readers for the dictionary happened to read it, perhaps in preference to, or with greater lexicographic productivity than, for example, Lady Audley's Secret or (not cited in OLD), Temple Bar, or Belgravia.
760-1) discussed the use of a lexicographic approach in which the alleviation of poverty has the first priority, and inequality enters as a second concern.