liberalization

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lib·er·al·ize

 (lĭb′ər-ə-līz′, lĭb′rə-)
v. lib·er·al·ized, lib·er·al·iz·ing, lib·er·al·iz·es
v.tr.
To make liberal or more liberal: "Our standards of private conduct have been greatly liberalized ... over recent years" (Meg Greenfield).
v.intr.
To become liberal or more liberal.

lib′er·al·i·za′tion (-lĭ-zā′shən) n.
lib′er·al·iz′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.liberalization - the act of making less strict
alleviation, easement, easing, relief - the act of reducing something unpleasant (as pain or annoyance); "he asked the nurse for relief from the constant pain"
Translations

liberalization

[ˌlɪbərəlaɪˈzeɪʃən] Nliberalización f

liberalization

[ˌlɪbrəlaɪˈzeɪʃən] liberalisation (British) n (= relaxation) → libéralisation f

liberalization

References in periodicals archive ?
As succinctly put in a staff memorandum, 'regardless of the pace, successful liberalizations have required complementary financial sector reforms'.
Against this backdrop, several national authorities have introduced or considered the use of capital controls (1) and the intellectual approach to financial liberalization is once again under serious consideration in economic and political circles alike (Subramanian and Williamson, 2009; The Economist, 2009).
The political implications of distinct economic liberalizations become crystal-clear once the social cleavages are integrated into the analysis.
Economic Liberalization and Center-Periphery Relations
Equity market liberalizations give foreign investors the opportunity to invest in domestic equity securities and domestic investors the right to transact in foreign equity securities.
Henry, 2001, "Stock Market Liberalizations and the Repricing of Systematic Risk," Stanford University, Working paper.
Given the recent currency crises and their adverse economic consequences, what is the role of financial liberalizations and foreign capital flows in the economic welfare of developing countries?
As a result of the arbitrage opportunities generated by these liberalizations, yen interest rates in domestic and international markets became much more tightly linked: The standard deviation of the differential between three-month Euroyen and domestic gensaki interest rates fell 88 percent between the 1975-80 period and the 1981-85 period (from 190 basis points to 23 basis points).
Those implemented under "placid" circumstances have survived nearly as well, particularly when they followed earlier successful liberalizations.
That has been the question plaguing economists and governments alike for several decades now, particularly as market liberalizations have been followed by economic crises in countries such as Mexico, South Korea, and Thailand.
In a related study, Henry found that stock market liberalizations are followed by a surge in the growth rate of private investment.