libertarian socialism


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libertarian socialism

n.
A political doctrine that promotes decentralized collectivism as a means of maximizing individual freedom and minimizing the power of the state and of concentrated private wealth.

libertarian socialist n.
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A communist uncle was instrumental in stimulating teenage Noam's fascination with politics, but even as a young man he leaned more towards anarcho-syndicalism or libertarian socialism. In the 1950s, he even toyed with the idea of settling down in an Israeli kibbutz, a way of life that seemed closest to anarchist ideals, but he and his wife, Carol, decided against it after a month-long experimental sojourn.
Non-anarchists will gain a better understanding of the habitually misrepresented Bakunin, as well as where anarchism comes from, so better to understand what it is (libertarian socialism) and, perhaps more importantly, what it is not (i.e.
The first volume defines anarchism as a form of revolutionary and libertarian socialism and outlines its main ideas, particularly in relation to the ideas of Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, classical Marxism, and economic liberalism.
Early adulthood saw Bookchin involved in various Communist Party organizations, though he soon broke with the Communists, aligning for a time with the Trotskyist movement before moving towards libertarian socialism after World War II.
The result in Mill is a seemingly odd but historically influential hybrid that I will here call "libertarian socialism." My interest, then, is not in demonstrating whether the "true" Mill was in theory two parts libertarian and three parts socialist or the reverse.
In the end, though, for all his efforts to make political capital out of the spirit of '68, Mr Horn has to admit that 'self-management-oriented libertarian socialism was nowhere victorious'.
His form of 'libertarian socialism' wants to empower individuals to develop their creative skills and to fulfil their potential.
In drawing together socialist and anarchist activities, he says that for him "socialism from below" might also be called "libertarian socialism" and uses the words interchangeably with "revolutionary." (251) His aim is to address the new anti-capitalist activists avoiding characterizations and while there is some strength to this approach, he also avoids some political questions which I will discuss later.
The PT is quite an original party, founded in 1980 by unionists, leftist Christians, and Marxist militants, all convinced that the emancipation of the workers will be the task of the workers themselves and stirred by the desire to invent a different, radical, democratic, libertarian socialism that breaks with the old models of Stalinism and social democracy.
Those who advocate some kind of rapprochement between lifestyle and social anarchism, therefore, misunderstand the nature of social anarchism (or libertarian socialism)--for a libertarian perspective is intrinsic to Kropotkin's conception of social anarchism.
In a new introduction, Bookchin backs away from the term "anarchism," now preferring "libertarian socialism." Although he makes no reference to it in the text, this is perhaps a reaction to theoretical battles in the 1990s between him and those he termed "lifestyle anarchists."
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