libertinage


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lib·er·tin·age

 (lĭb′ər-tē′nĭj)
n.
Libertinism.
Translations

libertinage

[ˈlɪbətɪnɪdʒ] Nlibertinaje m
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References in classic literature ?
Only, her mental excesses were theoretical, hedged in by so much humane feeling and conventional reserves, that they amounted to no more than mere libertinage of thought; whereas the other woman, the governess of Flora de Barral, was, as you may have noticed, severely practical--terribly practical.
Why shouldn't a governess have passions, all the passions, even that of libertinage, and even ungovernable passions; yet suppressed by the very same means which keep the rest of us in order: early training--necessity--circumstances--fear of consequences; till there comes an age, a time when the restraint of years becomes intolerable--and infatuation irresistible .
C'est le grand libertinage de la nature et de la mer qui m'accapare tout entier[beaucoup plus grand que].
(3) Elle choque par son anticonformisme et par son "libertinage" qu'elle revendique.
Irreligion et libertinage au debut de l'epoque moderne, Parigi: Classiques Garnier.
Le principe de delicatesse: libertinage et melancolie au XVIIIe siecle, Paris, Albin Michel.
Entre un petrarquisme qui abandonne ou sublime les plaisirs de la chair et un libertinage sexuel debride, Ronsard propose une solution alternative, qui est celle d'un hedonisme modere, ou d'une constance dans--ou malgre--l'inconstance (37).
(57) The love in a woman is difficult to sustain if the woman were to engage in "wanton coupling and libertinage," (58) and the man's desire to safeguard the dignity of the woman, motivated as it is by his magnanimous reaction to her love, is compromised if he is not monogamous.
4 THE DEATH OF LOUIS XIV (Albert Serra) Whereas Roberto Rossellini's 1966 chronicle of the monarch's rise to power focused on sartorial style as political stratagem, Albert Serra, the Catalan connoisseur of libertinage, concentrates on the king's attenuated demise by gangrene.
Emphasising the 'moral libertinage' of the poorer classes, the regime made clear that the Hopital General would become a place where these undisciplined populations would be confined and re-trained in the virtues of family, marriage, religion, Christian education and civic virtue; or in other words, the 'laws of the state'.