licencer

licencer

(ˈlaɪsənsə)
n
another spelling of licenser
References in periodicals archive ?
This book represents a cooperative attempt to flesh out the experience and to reassess the influence of a man whose career attracts scholars from a variety of disciplines and methodological approaches, and who himself embodies many of the paradoxes of late seventeenth-century England, the sometime Licencer of the press and prolific polemicist Roger L'Estrange.
(14) One clear instance of revival, although not of scriptural drama, is provided by an entry from Herbert's records as Master of the Revels, the licencer of plays for performance.
ARM Holdings Plc, the Cambridge, UK RISC processor technology licencer, has picked up two major customers for the ARM9E combined control and digital signal processor (DSP) device it launched last month (CI No 3,655).
The company discovered that licence manufacturing produced a higher priced copy of the original - New Zealand had none of the economies of scale or industrial infrastructure of the licencer's country.
But Swiney also hints that alleged personal satire in some scenes "Alarm'd the Licencer" and had to be cut, suggesting more than just a theatrical scheduling conflict.(18) Like Cibber, he complains that Killigrew was an indiscriminate censor, claiming that he "generally destroys with as much Distinction as the old Woman in Don Quixots Library, and wou'd a sav'd no more of 'em, if it were not, that he is pay'd for Tolerating some." But this sounds like the complaint of a wronged author, and there is nothing to suggest that Killigrew was as severe a censor as Cibber and Swiney assert.(19)
There it was that I found and visited the famous Galileo grown old, a prisoner to the Inquisition, for thinking in Astronomy otherwise then the Franciscan and Dominican I licencers thought.
Milton told of his encounter in Tuscany in a single, frustratingly unadorned sentence in "Areopagitica": "There it was that I found and visited the famous Galileo grown old, a prisoner to the Inquisition, for thinking in Astronomy otherwise than the Franciscan and Dominican licencers thought." (7) A nineteenth-century fantasy of that visit survives in an oil painting by Annibale Gatta at Florence's History of Science Museum: a grimly animated Galileo leans forward to make a point, gesturing with outstretched hand to a callow-looking youth seated before the delicate little "optic glass" that transformed astronomy.