interface

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in·ter·face

 (ĭn′tər-fās′)
n.
1. A surface forming a common boundary between adjacent regions, bodies, substances, or phases.
2. A point at which independent systems or diverse groups interact: "the interface between crime and politics where much of our reality is to be found" (Jack Kroll).
3. Computers
a. A system of interaction or communication between a computer and another entity such as a printer, another computer, a network, or a human user.
b. A device, such as a cable, network card, monitor, or keyboard, that enables interaction or communication between a computer and another entity.
c. The layout or design of the interactive elements of a computer program, an online service, or an electronic device.
v. (ĭn′tər-fās′) in·ter·faced, in·ter·fac·ing, in·ter·fac·es
v.tr.
1. To join by means of an interface.
2. To serve as an interface for.
v.intr.
1. To serve as an interface or become interfaced.
2. Usage Problem To interact or coordinate smoothly: "Theatergoers were lured out of their seats and interfaced with the scenery" (New York Times).

in′ter·fa′cial adj.
Usage Note: The noun interface, meaning "a surface forming a common boundary, as between bodies or regions," has been around since the 1880s. But the word did not really take off until the 1960s, when it began to be used in the computer industry to designate the point of interaction between a computer and another system, such as a printer. The word was applied to other interactions as well—between departments in an organization, for example, or between fields of study. Shortly thereafter, interface developed a use as a verb, but many people objected to it, considering it an example of bureaucratic jargon. The Usage Panel has been unable to muster much enthusiasm for the verb. In our 2011 survey, 57 percent found it unacceptable in an example designating interaction between people: The managing editor must interface with a variety of freelance editors and proofreaders. This level of disapproval is only slightly lower than the 63 percent recorded in our 1995 survey, suggesting that writers who wish to avoid a jargony tone would do well to avoid the usage. In 2011, a slightly larger percentage disapproved of interface in examples indicating interaction between a corporation and the public (66 percent) or between various communities in a city (65 percent).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

interface

n
1. (Chemistry) chem a surface that forms the boundary between two bodies, liquids, or chemical phases
2. a common point or boundary between two things, subjects, etc
3. (Computer Science) an electrical circuit linking one device, esp a computer, with another
vb
4. (Computer Science) (tr) to design or adapt the input and output configurations of (two electronic devices) so that they may work together compatibly
5. (Computer Science) to be or become an interface (with)
6. to be or become interactive (with)
interfacial adj
ˌinterˈfacially adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•ter•face

(n. ˈɪn tərˌfeɪs; v. also ˌɪn tərˈfeɪs)

n., v. -faced, -fac•ing. n.
1. a surface regarded as the common boundary of two bodies, spaces, or phases.
2. the area shared by or linking two or more disciplines or fields of study.
3. a common boundary or interconnection between systems, equipment, concepts, or people.
4. something that enables separate and sometimes incompatible elements to coordinate or communicate.
5. communication or interaction.
6. computer hardware or software designed to communicate information between hardware devices, between software programs, between devices and programs, or between a computer and a user.
v.t.
7. to bring into an interface.
8. to bring together; connect or mesh.
v.i.
9. to be in an interface.
10. to function as an interface.
11. to meet or communicate directly; interact; coordinate.
[1880–85]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

interface

A boundary or point common to two or more similar or dissimilar command and control systems, sub-systems, or other entities against which or at which necessary information flow takes place.
Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.

interface


Past participle: interfaced
Gerund: interfacing

Imperative
interface
interface
Present
I interface
you interface
he/she/it interfaces
we interface
you interface
they interface
Preterite
I interfaced
you interfaced
he/she/it interfaced
we interfaced
you interfaced
they interfaced
Present Continuous
I am interfacing
you are interfacing
he/she/it is interfacing
we are interfacing
you are interfacing
they are interfacing
Present Perfect
I have interfaced
you have interfaced
he/she/it has interfaced
we have interfaced
you have interfaced
they have interfaced
Past Continuous
I was interfacing
you were interfacing
he/she/it was interfacing
we were interfacing
you were interfacing
they were interfacing
Past Perfect
I had interfaced
you had interfaced
he/she/it had interfaced
we had interfaced
you had interfaced
they had interfaced
Future
I will interface
you will interface
he/she/it will interface
we will interface
you will interface
they will interface
Future Perfect
I will have interfaced
you will have interfaced
he/she/it will have interfaced
we will have interfaced
you will have interfaced
they will have interfaced
Future Continuous
I will be interfacing
you will be interfacing
he/she/it will be interfacing
we will be interfacing
you will be interfacing
they will be interfacing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been interfacing
you have been interfacing
he/she/it has been interfacing
we have been interfacing
you have been interfacing
they have been interfacing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been interfacing
you will have been interfacing
he/she/it will have been interfacing
we will have been interfacing
you will have been interfacing
they will have been interfacing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been interfacing
you had been interfacing
he/she/it had been interfacing
we had been interfacing
you had been interfacing
they had been interfacing
Conditional
I would interface
you would interface
he/she/it would interface
we would interface
you would interface
they would interface
Past Conditional
I would have interfaced
you would have interfaced
he/she/it would have interfaced
we would have interfaced
you would have interfaced
they would have interfaced
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011

interface

Circuits converting computer signals into a form that other electronic equipment can read.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.interface - (chemistry) a surface forming a common boundary between two things (two objects or liquids or chemical phases)
physical chemistry - the branch of chemistry dealing with the physical properties of chemical substances
surface - the extended two-dimensional outer boundary of a three-dimensional object; "they skimmed over the surface of the water"; "a brush small enough to clean every dental surface"; "the sun has no distinct surface"
oil-water interface - an interface forming the boundary between the non-miscible liquids oil and water
2.interface - (computer science) a program that controls a display for the user (usually on a computer monitor) and that allows the user to interact with the systeminterface - (computer science) a program that controls a display for the user (usually on a computer monitor) and that allows the user to interact with the system
computer science, computing - the branch of engineering science that studies (with the aid of computers) computable processes and structures
computer program, computer programme, programme, program - (computer science) a sequence of instructions that a computer can interpret and execute; "the program required several hundred lines of code"
CLI, command line interface - a user interface in which you type commands instead of choosing them from a menu or selecting an icon
graphical user interface, GUI - a user interface based on graphics (icons and pictures and menus) instead of text; uses a mouse as well as a keyboard as an input device
3.interface - the overlap where two theories or phenomena affect each other or have links with each other; "the interface between chemistry and biology"
overlap, convergence, intersection - a representation of common ground between theories or phenomena; "there was no overlap between their proposals"
4.interface - (computer science) computer circuit consisting of the hardware and associated circuitry that links one device with another (especially a computer and a hard disk drive or other peripherals)
computer circuit - a circuit that is part of a computer
parallel interface, parallel port - an interface between a computer and a printer where the computer sends multiple bits of information to the printer simultaneously
serial port - an interface (commonly used for modems and mice and some printers) that transmits data a bit at a time
SCSI, small computer system interface - interface consisting of a standard port between a computer and its peripherals that is used in some computers
computer science, computing - the branch of engineering science that studies (with the aid of computers) computable processes and structures
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

interface

noun
1. connection, link, boundary, border, frontier the interface between bureaucracy and the working world
verb
1. connect, couple, link, combine, join together the way we interface with the environment
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
rozhranístyčná plocha
csatlakozási felületinterfész
gränssnitt

interface

[ˈɪntəfeɪs]
1. N (Comput) → interfaz m or f, interface m or f
2. VI to interface withconectar con (Comput) → comunicarse mediante interfaz con
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

interface

[ˈɪntərfeɪs]
n
(COMPUTING)interface f user interface
(= meeting point) → interface f
the interface between technology and design → l'interface entre technologie et design
at the interface of → à l'interface de
[ˌɪntərˈfeɪs] vi
(= connect) [thing] → s'adapter
The components do not interface smoothly → Les composants ne s'adaptent pas bien.
[person] to interface with → interagir avec
the way we interface with the environment → la façon dont nous interagissons avec l'environnement
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

interface

n
Grenzfläche f, → Grenzschicht f; there’s a bigger interface between these two fields than I thoughtdiese beiden Gebiete haben mehr Berührungspunkte, als ich gedacht hätte
(Comput) → Schnittstelle f, → Interface nt; user interfaceBenutzeroberfläche f
vtkoppeln
vi to interface with somethingBerührungspunkte mit etw haben
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

interface

[ˈɪntəˌfeɪs] n (Comput) → interfaccia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Typical histological findings include spongiotic and lichenoid interface dermatitis with superficial and deep perivascular infiltrate and epidermal changes including hyperkeratosis, parakeratosis, focal spongiosis, and lymphocytic exocytosis.
Both types may be mistaken for squamous neoplasia or other lichenoid interface dermatitides with epidermal hyperplasia, particularly in superficial biopsies interpreted in the absence of adequate clinical information.