lifeblood

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life·blood

 (līf′blŭd′)
n.
1. Blood regarded as essential for life.
2. An indispensable or vital part: Capable workers are the lifeblood of the business.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lifeblood

(ˈlaɪfˌblʌd)
n
1. (Biology) the blood, considered as vital to sustain life
2. the essential or animating force
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

life•blood

(ˈlaɪfˌblʌd)

n.
1. the blood, considered as essential to maintain life.
2. a life-giving, vital, or animating element: Agriculture is the lifeblood of the country.
[1580–90]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lifeblood - the blood considered as the seat of vitality
blood - the fluid (red in vertebrates) that is pumped through the body by the heart and contains plasma, blood cells, and platelets; "blood carries oxygen and nutrients to the tissues and carries away waste products"; "the ancients believed that blood was the seat of the emotions"
2.lifeblood - an essential or life-giving force; "water is the lifeblood of India"
force - a powerful effect or influence; "the force of his eloquence easily persuaded them"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

lifeblood

noun animating force, critical, life, heart, inspiration, guts (informal), essence, stimulus, driving force, vital spark Coal and steel were the region's lifeblood.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

lifeblood

[ˈlaɪfblʌd] Nsangre f vital (fig) → alma f, sustento m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

lifeblood

[ˈlaɪfblʌd] n (fig)élément m moteur
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

lifeblood

[ˈlaɪfˌblʌd] n (fig) → linfa vitale
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Once I felt the great weight of one of the monsters upon my back and as keen talons sank into my flesh I experienced the frightful sensation of moist lips sucking the lifeblood from the wounds to which the claws still clung.
It made me almost frantic in my desire to find some way to keep warm and cooling lifeblood in her veins.
Then they and the priestesses formed in two lines, with their little golden cups in readiness to capture a share of the victim's lifeblood after the sacrificial knife had accomplished its work.