lifelessness


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life·less

 (līf′lĭs)
adj.
1. Having no life; inanimate.
2. Having lost life; dead. See Synonyms at dead.
3. Not inhabited by living beings or capable of sustaining life: a lifeless planet.
4. Lacking vitality or animation; dull: a lifeless party.

life′less·ly adv.
life′less·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lifelessness - a state of no motion or movement; "the utter motionlessness of a marble statue"
state - the way something is with respect to its main attributes; "the current state of knowledge"; "his state of health"; "in a weak financial state"
fixedness, immobility, stationariness - remaining in place
2.lifelessness - not having life
physiological property - a property having to do with the functioning of the body
deadness - the inanimate property of something that has died
insentience - lacking consciousness or ability to perceive sensations

lifelessness

noun
Translations

lifelessness

[ˈlaɪflɪsnɪs] N (fig) → falta f de vida

lifelessness

nLeblosigkeit f; (fig)Teilnahmslosigkeit f

lifelessness

[ˈlaɪflɪsnɪs] n (fig) → mancanza di vigore
References in classic literature ?
But there was an initial lifelessness in the silent bulk that gave the assassin momentary wonder.
Annushka went out, but Anna did not begin dressing, and sat in the same position, her head and hands hanging listlessly, and every now and then she shivered all over, seemed as though she would make some gesture, utter some word, and sank back into lifelessness again.
It was very heavy, and the lifelessness of it shocked her.
Sometimes we go flying down the great canals at such a gait that we can get only the merest glimpses into front doors, and again, in obscure alleys in the suburbs, we put on a solemnity suited to the silence, the mildew, the stagnant waters, the clinging weeds, the deserted houses and the general lifelessness of the place, and move to the spirit of grave meditation.
Frankenstein has daily declined in health; a feverish fire still glimmers in his eyes, but he is exhausted, and when suddenly roused to any exertion, he speedily sinks again into apparent lifelessness.
(26) Other descriptions of Rome written by visitors of the twelfth century reveal a similar sense of wonder at the beauty of the ancient works, but also sadness at their lifelessness, a sentiment exploited by Thomas in his depiction of Tristan before Iseut's statue.(12) Iseut's statue embodies both the purity and spiritual nature of the Virgin Mary statue and the seductive life-like quality of the Venus statue, representing a more comprehensive view of women than was possible in either one of the two idioms, Christian or classical, singly.
These being the early years of CGI, its essential lifelessness is still visible, betrayed by the resemblance between computer-generated "flesh" and molded plastic.
Now what disgust refers to here is certainly not lifelessness as such, or even dying and death: a skeleton, a mummy, the sight of a moribund person are perhaps depressing but not disgusting; whereas wounds, and even more skin rashes, may well be.
In consequence, this volume has just something of the lifelessness of the 'catalogue' that its jacket actually claims it to be.
The mental death inflicted by slavery is also symbolized by Sethe's unresponsive back, whose lifelessness mirrors both the repression of unbearable memories and, in a more general way, the suppression of all emotion, more particularly those dangerous feelings of love which are bound to be frustrated by an institution that systematically separates mothers and children, husbands and wives, families and friends.
lifelessness. (Schematism, the substitution of ideology for psychology, solemn proclamation, the automation of thought, the loss of the essence of the word - we have here all the signs of the violent demise of language.) All of that "Soviet Kazakhstan" literature, if we are to look at it with detachment, recalls a sick man's feverish dream.
Antoine, I am transported to another world of another politics and power, right from the start of the procession, when the opening phrase of the beginning carol is sung, at first from a distance by a lone, small boy with a high, fragile, clear voice: "Once in royal David's city ...." And then the stones and the oak, in spite of their lifelessness and their dedication to vainglory, ring with praise to the glory of God.