lifelike

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Related to lifelikeness: ephemerality

life·like

 (līf′līk′)
adj.
Accurately representing real life: a lifelike statue. See Synonyms at vivid.

life′like′ness n.

lifelike

(ˈlaɪfˌlaɪk)
adj
closely resembling or representing life
ˈlifeˌlikeness n

life•like

(ˈlaɪfˌlaɪk)

adj.
resembling or simulating real life: a lifelike portrait.
[1605–15]
life′like`ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.lifelike - evoking lifelike images within the mindlifelike - evoking lifelike images within the mind; "pictorial poetry and prose"; "graphic accounts of battle"; "a lifelike portrait"; "a vivid description"
realistic - aware or expressing awareness of things as they really are; "a realistic description"; "a realistic view of the possibilities"; "a realistic appraisal of our chances"; "the actors tried to create a realistic portrayal of the Africans"
2.lifelike - free from artificiality; "a lifelike pose"; "a natural reaction"
unaffected - free of artificiality; sincere and genuine; "an unaffected grace"

lifelike

lifelike

adjective
1. Accurately representing what is depicted or described:
2. Described verbally in sharp and accurate detail:
Translations
نابِض بالحَياه
živý
livagtig
eins og lifandi
canlı gibi

lifelike

[ˈlaɪflaɪk] ADJnatural; (= seemingly real) → que parece vivo
her photo is so lifelikela foto es el vivo retrato de ella

lifelike

[ˈlaɪflaɪk] adj [doll, dummy] → réaliste; [painting] → ressemblant(e)

lifelike

[ˈlaɪfˌlaɪk] adjche sembra vero/a, realistico/a

life

(laif) plural lives (laivz) noun
1. the quality belonging to plants and animals which distinguishes them from rocks, minerals etc and things which are dead. Doctors are fighting to save the child's life.
2. the period between birth and death. He had a long and happy life.
3. liveliness. She was full of life and energy.
4. a manner of living. She lived a life of ease and idleness.
5. the period during which any particular state exists. He had many different jobs during his working life.
6. living things. It is now believed that there may be life on Mars; animal life.
7. the story of a life. He has written a life of Churchill.
8. life imprisonment. He was given life for murder.
ˈlifeless adjective
1. dead. a lifeless body.
2. not lively; uninteresting. The actress gave a lifeless performance.
ˈlifelike adjective
like a living person, animal etc. The statue was very lifelike; a lifelike portrait.
life-and-ˈdeath adjective
serious and deciding between life and death. a life-and-death struggle.
ˈlifebelt noun
a ring or belt filled with air or made of a material which floats, for keeping a person afloat.
ˈlifeboat noun
a boat for saving shipwrecked people.
ˈlifebuoy noun
a buoy intended to support a person in the water till he can be rescued.
ˈlife-cycle noun
the various stages through which a living thing passes. the life-cycle of the snail.
life expectancy
the (average) length of time a person can expect to live.
ˈlifeguard noun
a person employed to protect and rescue swimmers at a swimming-pool, beach etc.
ˈlife-jacket noun
a sleeveless jacket filled with material that will float, for keeping a person afloat.
ˈlifeline noun
a rope for support in dangerous operations or thrown to rescue a drowning person.
ˈlifelong adjective
lasting the whole length of a life. a lifelong friendship.
ˈlife-saving noun
the act or skill of rescuing people from drowning. The boy is being taught life-saving.
ˈlife-size(d) adjective, adverb
(of a copy, drawing etc) as large as the original. a life-sized statue.
ˈlifetime noun
the period of a person's life. He saw many changes in his lifetime.
as large as life
in person; actually. I went to the party and there was John as large as life.
bring to life
to make lively or interesting. His lectures really brought the subject to life.
come to life
to become lively or interesting. The play did not come to life until the last act.
for life
until death. They became friends for life.
the life and soul of the party
a person who is very active, enthusiastic, amusing etc at a party.
not for the life of me
not even if it was necessary in order to save my life. I couldn't for the life of me remember his name!
not on your life!
certainly not!. `Will you get married?' `Not on your life!'
take life
to kill. It is a sin to take life.
take one's life
to kill oneself.
take one's life in one's hands
to take the risk of being killed.
to the life
exactly (like). When he put on that uniform, he was Napoleon to the life.
References in periodicals archive ?
Now, if we count every individual second-marker, on our watch, we are merely treating time inertly, failing to capture the lifelikeness of its motion or the facticity of its progressiveness.
In a SWOT analysis of educational VR by Minocha (2015), strengths include lifelikeness, error free learning, gaming to enhance motivation, environments that can be of low cost, distributed and duplicated, whereas weaknesses include limited body movement due to wires and displays, health consequences (dizziness, balance issues, etc.), and problems of platform compatibility.
Thus, the impression of absolute lifelikeness enhances the portrait of the king, as it is constructed on interrogation: "A countenance more in sorrow than in anger," "And fix'd his eyes upon you," "his beard was grizzled" (Shakespeare 2001: 39).
In his refusal to make any judgments about the statue's lifelikeness, he keeps himself at a willed distance from it even as he wishes to pronounce it alive.
Tsakiridou points out that Byzantine descriptions of visual art appeal to 'lifelikeness' and visual energy no less than Hellenistic discussions; it should not be assumed that the more modern theological indifference to aesthetic quality is a traditional view in the Eastern Christian world.
It might also have been nice to include more scholarship by scholars working in other disciplines, particularly the history of art, a field likewise currently preoccupied with questions of lifelikeness, vivency, artifice, and verisimilitude.
When she had gazed at it from every angle in its shrine viewable-all-around, She cried out, "Where did Praxiteles see me naked?" There is a crescendo of looking, here focalized through the evaluative eye of Aphrodite herself: she travels to Cnidus in order to see, her act of 'seeing' centers on and is facilitated by the open shrine, and the statue's lifelikeness seems to guarantee a prior act of surreptitious (artistic) looking.
In any case, viewers went to see "living photographs" and could then marvel at their lifelikeness. Musion's audiences, in contrast, are not always aware of the virtual nature of the performances they attend.
Here, lifelikeness follows the substitutive logic of graffiti tags, online avatars, and other such pictures that stand for an absent so-and-so.
Burra had an unusual ability to imbue inanimate objects with unease, and even in his most naturalistic painting, the bravura Owl and Quinces (1955-57; private collection), the eyes of the subject--a taxidermy owl in a case on a sideboard--give it an eerie lifelikeness as if it is watching for prey and about to swoop.
lifelikeness of the artwork (Browning's Duke of Ferrara pre-echoes
The Taylor rule is perceived very positively thanks to its intuitiveness, lifelikeness and simplicity.