likable

(redirected from likableness)
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lik·a·ble

also like·a·ble  (lī′kə-bəl)
adj.
Pleasing; attractive.

lik′a·ble·ness, like′a·ble·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

likable

(ˈlaɪkəbəl) or

likeable

adj
easy to like; pleasing
ˌlikaˈbility, ˌlikeaˈbility, ˈlikableness, ˈlikeableness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lik•a•ble

or like•a•ble

(ˈlaɪ kə bəl)

adj.
readily or easily liked; pleasing.
[1720–30]
lik′a•ble•ness, lik`a•bil′i•ty, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.likable - (of characters in literature or drama) evoking empathic or sympathetic feelingslikable - (of characters in literature or drama) evoking empathic or sympathetic feelings; "the sympathetic characters in the play"
drama - the literary genre of works intended for the theater
2.likable - easy to like; agreeable; "an attractive and likable young man"
liked - found pleasant or attractive; often used as a combining form; "a well-liked teacher"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

likable

likeable
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
مُسْتَحَب، خَفيف الظِّل، جذّاب
rokonszenves

like2

(laik) verb
1. to be pleased with; to find pleasant or agreeable. I like him very much; I like the way you've decorated this room.
2. to enjoy. I like gardening.
ˈlik(e)able adjective
(of a person) agreeable and attractive.
ˈliking noun
1. a taste or fondness (for). He has too great a liking for chocolate.
2. satisfaction. Is the meal to your liking?
should/would like
want. I would like to say thank you; Would you like a cup of tea?
take a liking to
to begin to like. I've taken a liking to him.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

likable

a. agradable, amable, simpático-a.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
And Michael, by the dim glows of the pipe surveying the scene of the two old men, one squatted in the dark, the other standing, knew naught of the tragedy of age, and was only aware, and overwhelmingly aware, of the immense likableness of this two- legged white god, who, with fingers of magic, through ear-roots and tail-roots and spinal column, had won to the heart of him.
The results of the sensory profile analysis for the parameter general likableness of taste within the first panel were transformed and processed by the Friedman test.
Aquino, "The effects of blame attributions and offender likableness on forgiveness and revenge in the workplace," Journal of Management, vol.
Yet, as I say, the increasing complexity of the characters is accompanied by an increasing likableness as well as interest." AS.
(1992), "The Good Professional: Effects of Trait-profile Gender Type, Androgyny, and Likableness on Impressions of Incumbents of Sex-typed Occupations," Sex Roles 27: 517-532.
The effects of blame attribution and offender likableness on forgiveness and revenge in the work place.
All in all, "Sleeping Beauty" kept the audience on their toes with the observations on offer made that were made endearing by the genuine likableness of the overall enterprise.
Criteria used to measure scientific performance include productivity in written work, recent reports, originality of written work, professional society membership, judgment of actual work output, creativity ratings by high-level supervisors, overall quality ratings by immediate supervisors, likableness as a member of the research team, visibility, recognition for organizational contributions, status-seeking tendencies, current organizational status, and contract-monitoring load (44).