limbic system

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limbic system

n.
A group of interconnected deep brain structures common to all mammals, including the hippocampus and amygdala, involved in olfaction, emotion, motivation, behavior, and various autonomic functions.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

limbic system

(ˈlɪmbɪk)
n
(Anatomy) the part of the brain bordering on the corpus callosum: concerned with basic emotion, hunger, and sex
[C19 limbic, from French limbique, from limbe limbus, from New Latin limbus, from Latin: border]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lim′bic sys`tem


n.
a group of structures in the brain that include the hippocampus, olfactory bulbs, hypothalamus, and amygdala and are associated with emotion and homeostasis.
[1950–55]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

limbic system

- From Latin limbus, "edge," it is the network of the brain involving areas near the edge of the cortex and controls the basic emotions and drives.
See also related terms for network.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

limbic system

Part of the forebrain encircling the brain stem and largely involved in emotional responses.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.limbic system - a system of functionally related neural structures in the brain that are involved in emotional behaviorlimbic system - a system of functionally related neural structures in the brain that are involved in emotional behavior
trigonum cerebrale, fornix - an arched bundle of white fibers at the base of the brain by which the hippocampus of each hemisphere projects to the contralateral hippocampus and to the thalamus and mamillary bodies
neural structure - a structure that is part of the nervous system
amygdala, amygdaloid nucleus, corpus amygdaloideum - an almond-shaped neural structure in the anterior part of the temporal lobe of the cerebrum; intimately connected with the hypothalamus and the hippocampus and the cingulate gyrus; as part of the limbic system it plays an important role in motivation and emotional behavior
hippocampus - a complex neural structure (shaped like a sea horse) consisting of grey matter and located on the floor of each lateral ventricle; intimately involved in motivation and emotion as part of the limbic system; has a central role in the formation of memories
cingulate gyrus, gyrus cinguli - a long curved structure on the medial surface of the cerebral hemispheres; the cortical part of the limbic system
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

lim·bic sys·tem

n. sistema límbico, grupo de estructuras cerebrales.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Teens have a higher risk of addiction because their limbic systems are very sensitive to dopamine.
Topics cover include: Various forms of cortical dysfunctions, such as seizures, disconnection syndrome, coma, and dementia; The role of prefrontal cortex in behavior and attention, introducing the topic of autism; Up-to-date information on the auditory, vestibular, gustatory, and limbic systems; The neurochemistry of the limbic system, memory and associated disorders, and the structural and neuronal circuitry of the hippocampal gyrus; Structural organization and associated pathways of the extrapyramidal system, demonstrating the neurochemical basis of movement disorders, and more.
Designed as a study guide for the USMLE but also useful as a refresher and course supplement, this compact treatment covers a range of topics, including development, gross anatomy, blood supply, cytology, the spinal cord, the brain stem, the cerebellum, basal ganglia, diencephalon and limbic systems, visual system, papillary reflexes, the cerebral cortex and higher functions.
Once the students' collective limbic systems have had their say, rational cortical processes can settle the issue.