liminality


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lim·i·nal

 (lĭm′ə-nəl)
adj.
1. Intermediate between two states, conditions, or regions; transitional or indeterminate: "While doctors operate, she hangs suspended in the liminal space between life and death" (Jeremy Eichler).
2. Existing at the limen. Used of stimuli.

[Latin līmen, līmin-, threshold + -al.]

lim′i·nal′i·ty (-năl′ĭ-tē) n.
lim′i·nal·ly adv.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among their topics are the monster's mystique: managing a state of bio-normative liminality and exception, patriarchal law and the ethics and aesthetics of monstrosity in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, exposed: dispossession and androgyny in contemporary British fiction, Southern Gothic: the monster as freak in the fiction of Flannery O'Connor, Harry Potter and monstrous diversity: the Brexit case, and monsters and criminal law.
The book does and doesn't "really have much to say," and calls itself "a novel that even a passing dog would laugh at." By embracing this nether space, Moon creates a darkly comic meta-text about the liminality of what we experience and create.
However, the "places and spaces" framework quickly becomes formulaic and tiresome, and references to hybridity and liminality invariably signal a lack of careful analysis.
Analytically, we introduce the concept of 'ceasefire state-making' to capture the particular dynamics of state-making in the interim phase between the signing of a ceasefire and a political settlement, which we understand to carry the characteristic of liminality (Turner 1969, pp.
"The show is called 'The Visit' as a direct exploration and I wanted to represent a state of in-between or liminality because I'm interested in liminality as a notion," Ghaddar told The Daily Star, "the experience of the viewer and the space where you're at the threshold of skin, space or the edge of something that will happen or has already happened."
Therefore, the objective of the present study is to address liminality in Rumors of Rain.
From discrete events and places like soccer matches, cinemas, and hotels, the authors elicit an intriguing history of liminality that invites a critical rereading of colonial era subjectivities.
Lurid Laughter and Liminality: Female Tricksters in Global Narrative.
Music from or inspired by the Celtic nations, and themes of marginality and liminality are discussed in a number of the book's other chapters.