limitable


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lim·it

 (lĭm′ĭt)
n.
1. The point, edge, or line beyond which something ends, may not go, or is not allowed: the 12-mile fishing limit; the limit of my patience.
2. limits The boundary surrounding a specific area; bounds: within the city limits.
3. Something that restricts or restrains; a restraint: The child needs to have limits put on his behavior.
4. The greatest or least amount, number, or extent allowed or possible: a withdrawal limit of $200; no minimum age limit.
5. Games The largest amount which may be bet at one time in games of chance.
6. Abbr. lim Mathematics
a. A number or point L that is approached by a function f(x) as x approaches a if, for every positive number ε, there exists a number δ such that │f(x)-L│ < ε if │x-a│ < δ.
b. A number or point L that is approached by a sequence bn if, for every positive number ε, there exists a number N such that │bn-L│ < ε if n > N. Also called limit point.
7. Informal One that is intolerable, remarkable, or extreme in some other way: "That's the limit!" the babysitter exclaimed after the child spilled a glass of milk.
tr.v. lim·it·ed, lim·it·ing, lim·its
To confine or restrict with a limit: Let's limit the discussion to what is doable. The offer limits us to three for a dollar.

[Middle English limite, from Old French, border, from Latin līmes, līmit-, border, limit.]

lim′it·a·ble adj.
Synonyms: limit, restrict, confine, circumscribe
These verbs mean to establish or keep within specified bounds. Limit refers principally to the establishment of a maximum beyond which a person or thing cannot or may not go: The Constitution limits the president's term of office to four years. To restrict is to keep within prescribed limits, as of choice or action: The sale of alcohol is restricted to people who are 21 and older. Confine suggests imprisonment, restraint, or impediment: The children were confined to the nursery. Circumscribe connotes an encircling or surrounding line that confines, especially narrowly: "A man ... should not circumscribe his activity by any inflexible fence of rigid rules" (John Stuart Blackie).
References in periodicals archive ?
limitable by, Congress, but requiring only the ultimate concurrence of
pervasive, the least limitable, and the most demanding of the three
"?Un genero ilimitado?" y "Un genero limitable", en Antologia del ensayo uruguayo contemporaneo, Montevideo, Universidad de la Republica, Departamento de Publicaciones, pp.
[...] se asocia la ciudad con el espacio fisico medible, limitable, visible y demograficamente denso, definido en oposicion a lo rural, dejando de lado una aproximacion a lo urbano no como simple conglomerado de casas, edificios, calles, espacios publicos, etc., sino tambien como el eje de procesos economicos, sociales, politicos y culturales diferentes a los de la vida campesina, y en los cuales se anudan distintas formas de conflictividad que no necesariamente son resueltas mediante la apelacion de la violencia (Franco citado por Jaramillo, s.f., p.
23, 1785), in 2 The Writings op James Madison 166, 168 (Gaillard Hunt ed., 1901) (stating that enumeration might seem like a good way to limit the legislature, but that, in practice, the nature of legislative power might not be limitable in that manner).
b) Limitable o acotada: se dice que la RdP esta k- limitada si para todo marcado alcanzable se tiene que ningun lugar tiene un numero de marcas mayor que k.
In upholding the statute, the court stated that "[t]he police power is the least limitable of the powers of government." Id.