limping


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limp

 (lĭmp)
intr.v. limped, limp·ing, limps
1. To walk lamely, especially with irregularity, as if favoring one leg.
2. To move or proceed haltingly or unsteadily: The project limped along with half its previous funding.
n.
An irregular, jerky, or awkward gait.
adj. limp·er, limp·est
1. Lacking or having lost rigidity, as of structure or substance: limp, wet hair; an arm hanging limp over the side of the bed.
2. Lacking strength, vigor, or effectiveness; weak: limp political opposition.

[Probably from obsolete lymphault, lame, from Old English lemphealt : lemp-, hanging loosely + -healt, lame, limping.]

limp′ly adv.
limp′ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.limping - disability of walking due to crippling of the legs or feetlimping - disability of walking due to crippling of the legs or feet
disability of walking - a disability that interferes with or prevents walking
intermittent claudication - lameness due to pain in leg muscles because the blood supply is inadequate; pain subsides with rest
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
He spoke without enthusiasm; and the first man, limping into the milky stream that foamed over the rocks, vouchsafed no reply.
The man watched him go, limping grotesquely and lurching forward with stammering gait up the slow slope toward the soft sky-line of the low-lying hill.
With a desperation that was madness, unmindful of the pain, he hurried up the slope to the crest of the hill over which his comrade had disappeared - more grotesque and comical by far than that limping, jerking comrade.
Turning round, I found myself face to face with the fisherman's daughter, Limping Lucy.
One word does it as well as a hundred; and one word did it with Limping Lucy.
The man was limping on towards this latter, as if he were the pirate come to life, and come down, and going back to hook himself up again.
The officer walked in front, leaning on a stick and slightly limping. When he had advanced a few steps he stopped, having apparently decided that these were good quarters, turned round to the soldiers standing at the entrance, and in a loud voice of command ordered them to put up the horses.
Still smiling, the French officer spread out his hands before Gerasim's nose, intimating that he did not understand him either, and moved, limping, to the door at which Pierre was standing.
Pike, the malingerer, who, in his lifetime of deceit, had often successfully feigned a hurt leg, was now limping in earnest.
On the next day Koona went, and but five of them remained: Joe, too far gone to be malignant; Pike, crippled and limping, only half conscious and not conscious enough longer to malinger; Sol-leks, the one-eyed, still faithful to the toil of trace and trail, and mournful in that he had so little strength with which to pull; Teek, who had not travelled so far that winter and who was now beaten more than the others because he was fresher; and Buck, still at the head of the team, but no longer enforcing discipline or striving to enforce it, blind with weakness half the time and keeping the trail by the loom of it and by the dim feel of his feet.
I thought of the Time Traveller limping painfully upstairs.
"My ankle does hurt yet," admitted the girl, attempting a limping step.