linchpin


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linch·pin

or lynch·pin  (lĭnch′pĭn′)
n.
1. A locking pin inserted in the end of a shaft, as in an axle, to prevent a wheel from slipping off.
2. A central cohesive element: Reduced spending is the linchpin of their economic program.

[Middle English linspin : lins, linchpin (from Old English lynis) + pin, pin (from Old English pinn; see pin).]

linchpin

(ˈlɪntʃˌpɪn) or

lynchpin

n
1. (Mechanical Engineering) a pin placed transversely through an axle to keep a wheel in position
2. a person or thing regarded as an essential or coordinating element: the linchpin of the company.
[C14 lynspin, from Old English lynis]

linch•pin

(ˈlɪntʃˌpɪn)

n.
1. a pin inserted through the end of an axletree to keep the wheel on.
2. something that holds the various elements of a complicated structure together.
[1350–1400; alter. of Middle English lynspin <lyns, Old English lynis linchpin (c. Old Saxon lunisa, Middle High German luns(e))]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.linchpin - a central cohesive source of support and stabilitylinchpin - a central cohesive source of support and stability; "faith is his anchor"; "the keystone of campaign reform was the ban on soft money"; "he is the linchpin of this firm"
support - something providing immaterial assistance to a person or cause or interest; "the policy found little public support"; "his faith was all the support he needed"; "the team enjoyed the support of their fans"
2.linchpin - pin inserted through an axletree to hold a wheel on
pin - a small slender (often pointed) piece of wood or metal used to support or fasten or attach things
Translations

linchpin

[ˈlɪntʃpɪn] N (lit) → pezonera f (fig) → eje m

linchpin

[ˈlɪntʃpɪn] n (= key person, element) → pivot m

linchpin

nAchs(en)nagel m, → Lünse f; (fig)Stütze f; accurate timing is the linchpin of the entire operationdas ganze Unternehmen steht und fällt mit genauer Zeiteinteilung

linchpin

[ˈlɪntʃˌpɪn] n (in axle) → acciarino, bietta (fig) → perno
References in classic literature ?
(to this hour with less penitence than I ought to feel), that if these hands could have taken a linchpin out of his chaise-cart, they would have done it.
A linchpin had fallen out, and permitted one of the wheels to slide off.
There was the good old custom of taking the linchpins out of the farmers' and bagmen's gigs at the fairs, and a cowardly, blackguard custom it was.
Global Banking News-August 31, 2018-L3 acquires Azimuth Security and Linchpin Labs for undisclosed amount
M2 EQUITYBITES-August 31, 2018-L3 acquires Azimuth Security and Linchpin Labs for undisclosed amount
31 August 2018 - US-based communications systems company L3 Technologies (NYSE: LLL) has closed the acquisition of information security businesses Azimuth Security and Linchpin Labs, the company said.
'The verdict against the cricketer was reserved on August 16 and he was linchpin in the spot fixing scandal,' said PCB's legal advisor, adding that 'The tribunal has reached the verdict that the PCB's multiple charges against Nasir have been proved and he was banned for 10 years.'
-- During the previous two seasons, Cubs manager Joe Maddon often would refer to veteran pitcher John Lackey as the "linchpin" of the starting rotation.
Shahbaz termed contact with masses as a linchpin of democratic system and it serves as oxygen for all democratic political parties.
Summary: The 11th anniversary of the assassination of former Prime Minister Rafik Hariri will remain the linchpin of the "independence uprising" that led to the emergence of the March 14 coalition, the parliamentary Future bloc said Wednesday.
This is not a vintage Dutch side, especially with midfield linchpin Kevin Strootman injured, and their age profile is not ideal, plenty of emerging talent as well as veterans like Robin van Persie and Arjen Robben - but with few stars at their peak.
"He's kind of a linchpin to a lot of the storytelling and a lot of the storylines that [happened] early in the season, and his role will kind of emerge.