line engraving

(redirected from line engravings)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

line engraving

n.
1.
a. A metal plate, used in intaglio printing, on the surface of which design lines have been engraved by hand.
b. The process of making such an engraving.
c. A print made from such an engraving.
2. See line cut.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

line′ engrav`ing


n.
an engraving in which all effects are produced by variations in the width and density of lines incised with a burin.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

line engraving

Engraving directly onto a metal plate with cutting tools, producing precise lines and shading added by hatching dots. Probably began in fifteenth-century Italy, flowering in the work of Dürer.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.line engraving - a print obtained from a line drawingline engraving - a print obtained from a line drawing
engraving - a print made from an engraving
2.line engraving - engraving consisting of a block that has been etched or engraved
engraving - a block or plate or other hard surface that has been engraved
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
Almost invariably it is all over obliquely crossed and re-crossed with numberless straight marks in thick array, something like those in the finest Italian line engravings. But these marks do not seem to be impressed upon the isinglass substance above mentioned, but seem to be seen through it, as if they were engraved upon the body itself.
The 102 watercolours and seven line engravings that Blake left behind had been a much-needed source of both income and creative energy in those final years.
This method is the opposite of relief printing as, here, the ink is held in lines or depressions cut into the metal printing plate, examples being etchings, mezzotints, aquatints and line engravings.