lineality

lineality

(ˌlɪnɪˈælɪtɪ)
n
the quality or characteristic of being lineal
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
I have given a detailed presentation of some implications of their language elsewhere; but since it was in their language that I first noticed the absence of lineality, which led me to this study, I shall give here a summary of the implications of the language.
The very fact of poetry appearing almost entirely in the printed form, however, long disguised this shift from lineality, and helps, for example, to explain Hopkins' insistence on his poetry being heard.
(27) Molnar (2000:151-3), in her study of the neighbouring Hoga Sara whose sociocultural life has much in common with that of the Ngadha, is equally clear: 'The concept of lineality does not help much in explaining house membership [...] I propose that we dispense with this concept of lineality in the sense of descent, as it does not help us understand the various aspects of group membership and of social organization [...].
What is the modality of Lineality Collaterality humans' relationship (Authoritarian Collective Decisions to others?
Dumont also includes aspects of lineality in the discussion of Dravidian and Australian systems.
To move the analysis on: I noted that Jack Goody, in discussing the effects of lineality on presentation, asserted that
Lineality and top-down verticality were images of critique, as Kail attacked the transmission model of classroom education, by which teachers with virtually "sacred" (596) authority and power impose on totally passive students a body of knowledge.
These are the sex of god, presence of agriculture and hunting, monotheism, types of lineality, inheritance patterns and sex of ancestors.
In her highly influential Freedom and Culture (1959), she connects literacy to lineality in thought and perception; she also considers the impact of literacy in Valuing the Self (1976).
Given a domain [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] parameterized by p, let the set of its equalities (called its lineality space) be Az = a, where A is l x [n.sub.Y].