lineally


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Related to lineally: line of descent

lin·e·al

 (lĭn′ē-əl)
adj.
1. Belonging to or being in the direct line of descent from an ancestor.
2. Derived from or relating to a particular line of descent; hereditary.
3. Linear.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin līneālis, consisting of lines, from Latin līnea, line; see line1.]

lin′e·al·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.lineally - by an unbroken line of descent; "she is related lineally to the Royal Family"
References in classic literature ?
I could plainly discover whence one family derives a long chin; why a second has abounded with knaves for two generations, and fools for two more; why a third happened to be crack-brained, and a fourth to be sharpers; whence it came, what Polydore Virgil says of a certain great house, NEC VIR FORTIS, NEC FOEMINA CASTA; how cruelty, falsehood, and cowardice, grew to be characteristics by which certain families are distinguished as much as by their coats of arms; who first brought the pox into a noble house, which has lineally descended scrofulous tumours to their posterity.
At all events, Scheherazade, who, being lineally descended from Eve, fell heir, perhaps, to the whole seven baskets of talk, which the latter lady, we all know, picked up from under the trees in the garden of Eden-Scheherazade, I say, finally triumphed, and the tariff upon beauty was repealed.
The Princess was of the family of Pompili, lineally descended from the second king of Rome, and Egeria of the house of Olympus, while the Prince's grandfather, Alessandro Polonia, sold wash-balls, essences, tobacco, and pocket-handkerchiefs, ran errands for gentlemen, and lent money in a small way.
Indeed the multiscalar field models for inflation are of interest even on most recent studies, such as the abovementioned cases; however, one of the most important features in such models is the potential associated with the scalar fields, and in many cases, the employed potentials are simple polynomial powers of the scalar fields or in other cases the employed potential is a series of lineally summed exponentials; however, it has been shown that a potential of the form [mathematical expression not reproducible] is a good candidate to model the inflation phenomenon for multiscalar field theory, as discussed in previous work [27], and might provide a richer postinflation scenario.
In the range 20 to 500 mV x [s.sup.-1], [I.sub.p] of lead electrooxidation varied lineally on [v.sup.1/]2 and was expressed by the following:
Furthermore, SBP and DBP were not lineally correlated with urinary sodium excretion after age and sex were included as covariates (r [less than or equal to] 0.19; P [greater than or equal to] 0.046).
In this case, the training overhead lineally increases as the number of total IoT devices while the number of transmit-antenna can be extended as large as desired.
(41.) In his first speech to the English Parliament in 1604, James described the Union: "And now, in the End and Fulness of Time, united, the Right and Title of both in My Person, alike lineally descended of both the Crownes; whereby it is now become like a little World within it selfe," CJ, I: 143.
While they had some of the same personnel, aircraft, bases and functions of the old commands, they were not lineally connected with any of them.
The air pressure in the cuff was lineally deflated from approximately 200 mmHg to 30 mmHg at a rate of 2-3 mmHg/s.
It is present in the philosopher's phrasing of means and ends as lineally connected.
Percentage of birds involved in Wk over the 24 h period and 17 h light phase tended to increase lineally (p = 0.1) with increasing LI but the effect is minor.