lingo

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lin·go

 (lĭng′gō)
n. pl. lin·goes
The specialized vocabulary of a particular field or social group, especially when viewed as unfamiliar: computer lingo; the lingo of the local residents of the island; "the lingo that rough union guys used among themselves" (Philip Roth).

[Perhaps from Portuguese lingoa, tongue, language, or from Lingua Franca lingua, language; akin to Catalan llengua, Italian lingua, and Spanish lengua, tongue, language, all ultimately from Latin lingua; see dn̥ghū- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lingo

(ˈlɪŋɡəʊ)
n, pl -goes
(Linguistics) informal any foreign or unfamiliar language, jargon, etc
[C17: perhaps from lingua franca; compare Portuguese lingoa tongue]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lin•go

(ˈlɪŋ goʊ)

n., pl. -goes.
1. the language or vocabulary, esp. the jargon or slang, of a particular field, group, or individual.
2. language or speech, esp. if strange or foreign.
[1650–60; appar. alter. of lingua (franca)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lingo - a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves); "they don't speak our lingo"
bite - a portion removed from the whole; "the government's weekly bite from my paycheck"
swiz - British slang for a swindle
heist, rip-off - the act of stealing
shakedown - extortion of money (as by blackmail)
power trip - (slang) a self-aggrandizing action undertaken simply for the pleasure of exercising control over other people
nookie, nooky, piece of tail, roll in the hay, screwing, screw - slang for sexual intercourse
hand job - slang for masturbation
dekko - British slang for a look
square-bashing - drill on a barracks square
shakedown - a very thorough search of a person or a place; "a shakedown by the police uncovered the drugs"
caff - informal British term for a cafe
deck - street name for a packet of illegal drugs
gat, rod - a gangster's pistol
Mickey Finn - slang term for knockout drops
nick - (British slang) a prison; "he's in the nick"
dreck, schlock, shlock - merchandise that is shoddy or inferior
cert - an absolute certainty; "it's a dead cert"
legs - staying power; "that old Broadway play really has legs"
soup-strainer, toothbrush - slang for a mustache
bunghole - vulgar slang for anus
bay window, potbelly, tummy, corporation, pot - slang for a paunch
niff, pong - an unpleasant smell
street name - slang for something (especially for an illegal drug); "`smack' is a street name for heroin"
corker - (dated slang) a remarkable or excellent thing or person; "that story was a corker"
hooey, poppycock, stuff and nonsense, stuff - senseless talk; "don't give me that stuff"
baloney, bilgewater, boloney, bosh, drool, humbug, tommyrot, tosh, twaddle, taradiddle, tarradiddle - pretentious or silly talk or writing
codswallop, folderol, trumpery, wish-wash, applesauce, tripe, rubbish, trash - nonsensical talk or writing
skin flick - a pornographic movie
dibs - a claim of rights; "I have dibs on that last slice of pizza"
non-standard speech - speech that differs from the usual accepted, easily recognizable speech of native adult members of a speech community
rhyming slang - slang that replaces words with rhyming words or expressions and then typically omits the rhyming component; "Cockney rhyming slang"
bunfight, bun-fight - (Briticism) a grand formal party on an important occasion
burnup - a high-speed motorcycle race on a public road
nosh-up - a large satisfying meal
hood - (slang) a neighborhood
'hood - (slang) a neighborhood
paleface - (slang) a derogatory term for a white person (supposedly used by North American Indians)
white trash - (slang) an offensive term for White people who are impoverished
whitey - (slang) offensive names for a White man
slant-eye - (slang) a disparaging term for an Asian person (especially for North Vietnamese soldiers in the Vietnam War)
Injun, red man, Redskin - (slang) offensive term for Native Americans
sheeny - (ethnic slur) offensive term for a Jew
ginzo, greaseball, Guinea - (ethnic slur) offensive term for a person of Italian descent
Jap, Nip - (offensive slang) offensive term for a person of Japanese descent
spic, spik - (ethnic slur) offensive term for persons of Latin American descent
Boche, Jerry, Kraut, Krauthead, Hun - offensive term for a person of German descent
airhead - a flighty scatterbrained simpleton; "she's a total airhead"; "every airhead on a big salary rushed out to buy one"
babe, sister, baby - (slang) sometimes used as a term of address for attractive young women
bad egg - (old-fashioned slang) a bad person
boffin - (British slang) a scientist or technician engaged in military research
good egg - (old-fashioned slang) a good person
guvnor - (British slang) boss
old man - (slang) boss
out-and-outer - someone who is excellent at something
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

lingo

noun (Informal) language, jargon, dialect, talk, speech, tongue, idiom, vernacular, patter, cant, patois, argot I don't speak the lingo.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

lingo

noun
1. A variety of a language that differs from the standard form:
2. Specialized expressions indigenous to a particular field, subject, trade, or subculture:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

lingo

[ˈlɪŋgəʊ] N (lingoes (pl)) (= language) → lengua f, idioma m; (= specialist jargon) → jerga f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

lingo

[ˈlɪŋgəʊ] [lingoes] (pl) n
(= jargon) → jargon m
(= language) → langue f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

lingo

n (inf)Sprache f; (= specialist jargon)Jargon m, → Kauderwelsch nt (inf); I don’t speak the lingoich kann die Sprache (hier/dort) nicht (inf)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

lingo

[ˈlɪŋgəʊ] n (fam, pej) qualunque lingua straniera che risulti incomprensibile; (jargon) → gergo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
By the way," he added, turning over the paper to read the entertaining and instructive Fables, "I know the Heathenese lingo. Ying Shing means Rock Creek; it is in the Province of Wyo Ming."
I say, Professor," Tom called back to the savant, "you'd better speak to him in his lingo, I can't manage it.
We don't understand half of the sea lingo, Mum, and I dare say it's all wrong," cried Will, suddenly going over to the enemy, to Geordie's great disgust.
"As they turned them over one seemed still alive and, would you believe it, he jabbered something in their lingo."
And as for language, if you want to hear the dictionary overhauled like a log-line in a blow, you must go to Wapping and listen to the Lon’oners as they deal out their lingo. Howsomever, I see no such mighty matter that Miss Lizzy has been doing to you, good woman; so take another drop of your brews and forgive and forget, like an honest soul,”