linguistic form

linguistic form

n.
A meaningful unit of language, such as an affix, a word, a phrase, or a sentence.

linguis′tic form′


n.
any meaningful unit of speech, as a sentence, phrase, word, or morpheme.
[1920–25]
References in periodicals archive ?
Inkpin argues that Merleau-Ponty's reflections on the rationality of expressive systems resolve Heidegger's struggles to grasp the internal temporality of language as well as the way linguistic form conditions disclosure.
This usage contrasts quite remarkably with the semiotic format of campaign material from two decades earlier, where colours and symbols were the main components of campaign signage rather than linguistic form.
Ceding varying degrees of aesthetic agency to programmatic procedures that give visual and linguistic form to statistics, sociocultural phenomena, and chance operations, he is best known for large, labor-intensive, colored-pencil-and-graphite drawings that creep and sprawl across their supports in accordance with eccentric, self-imposed directives.
The encoded/inferred system has also been criticized for being too simplistic to represent the explicit and the implicit, since the recovery of any communicated assumption, including that encoded in a linguistic form, requires an element of inference (Carston, 2002; Sperber & Wilson, 1986).
Here it is assumed that the evaluation of parameters by the decision makers must be generalized fuzzy and may be presented in linguistic form or generalized FSS format, alternatively, in the form of generalized fuzzy soft matrices.
For this reason, rhyming examples can be very useful, as they may give information on the given linguistic form at the time of composition.
In language, prolongation is largely controlled by the syntax, the linear level in linguistic form.
This fanatical and absolute interpretation of a living linguistic form is a misunderstanding of how language works.
prior to the utterance of a linguistic form, there occurs within the speaker a nonphysical process, a thought, concept, image, feeling, act of will, or the like .
The word [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] is in fact an unusual example of a "late," Silver Age linguistic form, since it is never found even once in one of the main texts that are considered typical of the early, Golden Age Hebrew literature, such as the Pentateuch or Former Prophets.
The target linguistic form was presented through reading texts and participants were exposed to enhanced and non-enhanced texts.
Warschauer (1997) asserts that a text-based CMC amplifies learners' attention to linguistic form.