links


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Related to links: Linx

links

the rings of which a chair is composed; bonds or ties; connections
Not to be confused with:
lynx – a wildcat having long limbs, a short tail, and tufted ears

links

 (lĭngks)
pl.n.
1. A golf course.
2.
a. Chiefly Scots Relatively flat or undulating sandy turf-covered ground usually along a seashore. Also called linksland.
b. A golf course located on such land or on similarly treeless sandy terrain inland. Also called links course.

[From Middle English link, ridge of land, hill, from Old English hlinc, ridge.]

links

(lɪŋks)
pl n
1. (Golf)
a. short for golf links
b. (as modifier): a links course.
2. (Physical Geography) chiefly Scot undulating sandy ground near the shore
[Old English hlincas plural of hlinc ridge]

golf′ course`


n.
the usu. rolling 9- or 18-hole area of terrain, with greens and fairways, over which golf is played. Also called golf′ links`.

links

  • cuff link - Links the split cuff of a shirt.
  • portal - An Internet site offering a directory of links to other sites.
  • latch - Once was a loop or noose; a latch of links was a string of sausages.
  • vincula - Links, ties, and bonds.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.links - a golf course that is built on sandy ground near a shorelinks - a golf course that is built on sandy ground near a shore
golf course, links course - course consisting of a large landscaped area for playing golf
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
Translations
سواحِلملْعَب الغولْف
golfové hřištěpobřežní duny
golfbane
partszakasz
golfvöllursandöldur
plokščia jūros pakrantė
golfa laukumskāpas
pobrežné duny
denize yakın düz yergolf sahasıkumsal

links

[lɪŋks] NPL
1. (= golf links) → campo msing or (LAm) cancha fsing de golf
2. (= cuff links) → gemelos mpl, mancuernas fpl (CAm, Mex)

links

[ˈlɪŋks] npl (GOLF)(terrain m de) golf mlink-up [ˈlɪŋkʌp] n
(= relationship) → association f
[communication systems] → liaison f
[spaceships] → arrimage m

links

pl
Dünen pl
(= golf course)Golfplatz m

links

[lɪŋks] npl (golf links) → terreno or campo da golf

links

(liŋks) noun plural
1. a stretch of more or less flat ground along a seashore.
2. (often with singular verb) a golf course.
References in classic literature ?
To sum up, I believe that species come to be tolerably well-defined objects, and do not at any one period present an inextricable chaos of varying and intermediate links: firstly, because new varieties are very slowly formed, for variation is a very slow process, and natural selection can do nothing until favourable variations chance to occur, and until a place in the natural polity of the country can be better filled by some modification of some one or more of its inhabitants.
Yet on the links most of his time was spent in retrieving lost balls or replacing America.
The links that united her to the rest of humankind -- links of flowers, or silk, or gold, or whatever the material -- had all been broken.
But as this conductor must descend to considerable depth, that its end may avoid all contact with the hull; and as moreover, if kept constantly towing there, it would be liable to many mishaps, besides interfering not a little with some of the rigging, and more or less impeding the vessel's way in the water; because of all this, the lower parts of a ship's lightning-rods are not always overboard; but are generally made in long slender links, so as to be the more readily hauled up into the chains outside, or thrown down into the sea, as occasion may require.
And it is a solemn fact that the English in this Eastern exile have contrived to make a small golf links out of the green scrub and sand; with a comfortable clubhouse at one end of it and this primeval monument at the other.
I do not remember now the details of the weight and length of the fetters riveted on his limbs by an "Administrative" order, but it was in the number of pounds and the thickness of links an appalling assertion of the divine right of autocracy.
The long stretch of marshland, on which the golf links were situated, was empty.
Still it will always have some significant part, as 'in walking,' or 'Cleon son of Cleon.' A sentence or phrase may form a unity in two ways,--either as signifying one thing, or as consisting of several parts linked together.
In the mansion that he built at Arden, there were a hundred telephones, sixty of them linked to the long-distance lines.
'Here,' he could not but reflect, 'here is another link in the Judicial Error.'
I write it with the tears in my eyes -- you shall not link your fate to an outcast.
It hangs from the ship's side at the end of a heavy, projecting timber called the cat-head, in the bight of a short, thick chain whose end link is suddenly released by a blow from a top-maul or the pull of a lever when the order is given.