lipid


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lip·id

 (lĭp′ĭd, lī′pĭd) also lip·ide (lĭp′īd′, lī′pīd′)
n.
Any of a group of organic compounds, including the fats, oils, waxes, sterols, and triglycerides, that are insoluble in water but soluble in nonpolar organic solvents, are oily to the touch, and together with carbohydrates and proteins constitute the principal structural material of living cells.

[French lipide : Greek lipos, fat; see lipo- + French -ide, -ide.]

lip·id′ic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lipid

(ˈlaɪpɪd; ˈlɪpɪd) or

lipide

n
(Biochemistry) biochem any of a large group of organic compounds that are esters of fatty acids (simple lipids, such as fats and waxes) or closely related substances (compound lipids, such as phospholipids): usually insoluble in water but soluble in alcohol and other organic solvents. They are important structural materials in living organisms. Former name: lipoid
[C20: from French lipide, from Greek lipos fat]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lip•id

(ˈlɪp ɪd, ˈlaɪ pɪd)

also lip•ide

(-aɪd, -ɪd; -paɪd, -pɪd)

n.
any of a group of organic compounds comprising fats, waxes, and similar substances that are greasy, insoluble in water, and soluble in alcohol: one of the chief structural components of the living cell.
[< French lipide (1923) = Greek líp(os) fat + French -ide -id3]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

lip·id

(lĭp′ĭd)
Any of a large group of organic compounds composed of fats and fatty compounds that are oily to the touch and insoluble in water. Lipids include fatty acids, oils, waxes, sterols, and triglycerides. They are a source of stored energy and are a component of cell membranes.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lipid - an oily organic compound insoluble in water but soluble in organic solvents; essential structural component of living cells (along with proteins and carbohydrates)
fat - a soft greasy substance occurring in organic tissue and consisting of a mixture of lipids (mostly triglycerides); "pizza has too much fat"
triglyceride - glyceride occurring naturally in animal and vegetable tissues; it consists of three individual fatty acids bound together in a single large molecule; an important energy source forming much of the fat stored by the body
macromolecule, supermolecule - any very large complex molecule; found only in plants and animals
oil - a slippery or viscous liquid or liquefiable substance not miscible with water
phospholipid - any of various compounds composed of fatty acids and phosphoric acid and a nitrogenous base; an important constituent of membranes
wax - any of various substances of either mineral origin or plant or animal origin; they are solid at normal temperatures and insoluble in water
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
lipidi
lípíð

lipid

[ˈlaɪpɪd] Nlípido m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

lipid

[ˈlaɪpɪd] n (Biochemistry) → lipide m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

lip·id

n. lípido, sustancia orgánica que no se disuelve en el agua pero que es soluble en alcohol, éter o cloroformo.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lipid

n lípido
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
DIR LOWER -- On the recommendations of District Food Controller Abubakar Mahmood who received complaints through Pakistan Citizen Portal, the Deputy Commissioner Tuesday under section 144 imposed ban on animal lipid material (Dhall) used in Chapal Kabab.
The studies have shown an association between body mass index (BMI) and triglycerides (TGs) and the association between lipid profile and body fat distribution had been much discussed during the past decades.
The researchers also investigated if solvents are required for lipid extraction of electrolyzed cells.
Ann Arbor, MI, July 21, 2018 --(PR.com)-- Cayman Chemical, a leading supplier of bioactive lipids, analytical standards, and contract lipidomic services, has increased its financial support of the LIPID MAPS[R] Lipidomics Gateway.
acanthurus fed on diets with inclusion of krill meal and oil (protein and lipid sources, respectively), matured faster and reduce their growth performances than females fed on fish meal and oil.
HEPATITIS C VIRUS infection often is associated with the accumulation of fat in hepatocytes, which shows a connection between the virus and the lipid metabolism of the liver, according to Sarah Hoffman, MD, of the Leibniz Institute for Experimental Virology, Hamburg, Germany, and her colleagues.
According to a study conducted by the Michigan State University, a particular type of lipid, or fat, thought to only exist in the skin, now lives in your eye and might play a major role in deterring the eye disease.
Novartis Pharmaceuticals is promoting the lipid containing dry eye drop, Systane Balance.
The European Atherosclerosis Society/European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine recently published a consensus statement promoting the routine use of nonfasting blood samples for the assessment of plasma lipid profiles.
N/P ratio was calculated based on nitrogen containing DOTAP lipid (699 g/mol) and the phosphorus containing phosphate group for pDNA (330 g/mol).
Lipid peroxidation has been implicated in the etiology of several diseases.