lipopolysaccaride

lipopolysaccaride

(ˌlɪpəʊˌpɒlɪˈsækəˌraɪd)
n
(Biochemistry) a molecule, consisting of lipid and polysaccharide components, that is the main constituent of the cell walls of Gram-negative bacteria
References in periodicals archive ?
An ELISA with Brucella lipopolysaccaride antigen for the diagnosis of B.
Gallinarum have same O antigen (O9) of the lipopolysaccaride on their cell surfaces, which led to competition between these two serovars in the poultry (Velge et al., 2005).
Nick, "Regulation of manganese superoxide dismutase by lipopolysaccaride, interleukin-1, and tumor necrosis factor," The Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol.
Gram-positive bacteria have a thick layer of peptidoglycan protecting the cell membrane, whereas gram-negative bacteria have an exposed cell membrane displaying lipopolysaccaride (LPS), a carbohydrate-fat complex.
PAMP are indispensable parts of the microbes, such as lipopolysaccaride (LPS), peptidoglycan, bacterial DNA/heat shock proteins (HSP) and viral DNA/RNA [45].
This project involved analysis of lipopolysaccaride (LPS) stimulated HMC-1 cells using microscopy and Western blot.
The link between periodontitis, preterm birth and low birth weight may be that, in the presence of periodontal disease, lipopolysaccaride exposure, inflammatory mediators and maternal cytokine production in the maternal serum, the patient is at risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes.
Previous in vitro and animal studies on macrophages or dendritic cells showed that bacterial products, such as the toll-like receptors ligands lipopolysaccaride or bacterial DNA (4,5), proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor and interferon (1,6), or glucocorticoids (7) induce the upregulation of IDO (8).
Perhaps the first research paper of CLA in chickens was about prevention of the reduced body weight induced by lipopolysaccaride (LPS) (Cook et al., 1993).
Among the molecular patterns recognized by complement are lipopolysaccaride (LPS), a component of the cell wall in gram-negative bacteria (Agramonte-Hevia et al., 2002); peptidoglycan and lipoteichoic acid from the cell wall of gram-positive bacteria (Kawasaki et al., 1987); bacterial DNA (Heine et al., 2005); bacterial N-formylmethioninemannose, a sugar common in bacterial glycolipids and glycoproteins but rare in mammals; viral double-stranded RNA (Vandermeer et al., 2004); and glucans, components of fungal cell walls (Ma et al., 2004; Zhang et al., 2001).