liquid measure

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liquid measure

n.
1. The measurement of liquid capacity.
2. A unit or system of units of liquid capacity.

liquid measure

n
(Units) a unit or system of units for measuring volumes of liquids or their containers

liq′uid meas′ure


n.
the system of volumetric units ordinarily used in measuring liquid commodities, as milk or oil.
[1850–55]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.liquid measure - a unit of capacity for liquids (for measuring the volumes of liquids or their containers)liquid measure - a unit of capacity for liquids (for measuring the volumes of liquids or their containers)
United States liquid unit - a liquid unit officially adopted in the United States Customary System
British capacity unit, Imperial capacity unit - a unit of measure for capacity officially adopted in the British Imperial System; British units are both dry and wet
arroba - a liquid measure (with different values) used in some Spanish speaking countries
bath - an ancient Hebrew liquid measure equal to about 10 gallons
mutchkin - a Scottish unit of liquid measure equal to 0.9 United States pint
oka - a Turkish liquid unit equal to 1.3 pints
Translations

liquid measure

nFlüssigkeitsmaß nt
References in periodicals archive ?
MATHS in my early years at school, when not spent in air raid shelters, consisted of learning multiplication tables up to 12 times, old pound shilling and pence currency, ounces to tons weight measures, gills to gallons liquid measures, inches to miles for lengths, including naval measures, and Fahrenheit temperatures.
MATHS in my early years at school when not spent in air raid shelters consisted of learning multiplication tables up to 12 times, old pound shilling and pence currency, ounces to tons weight measures, gills to gallons liquid measures, inches to miles lengths, including naval measures, and Fahrenheit temperatures.
were so the content founded the Jack and Jill could refer to an attempt to reform the tax on liquid measures, although a Somerset village claims it is about a young unmarried couple who used the hill for trysts.