liquidationist

(redirected from liquidationism)

liquidationist

(ˌlɪkwɪˈdeɪʃənɪst)
adj
(Economics) pertaining to or promoting a theory of economics which holds that governments should not interfere in a recession. Compare individualism3, laissez faire
n
(Economics) a proponent of such a theory
[from liquidation + -ist]
ˌliquiˈdationism n
References in periodicals archive ?
By the early 1950s, the particularities of entryism in Canada could not be separated from a general politics of liquidationism that was becoming increasingly prominent in the international leadership of the FI.
Until recently, the verdict on liquidationism seemed clear: It has been rejected and ridiculed not just by liberals and Keynesians but by conservatives too, including none other than Milton Friedman.
The first point regarding the Rothbard thesis is that it was Hoover's Secretary of the Treasury, Andrew Mellon (a holdover from previous Republican administrations) who was the advocate of do-nothing liquidationism. Mellon wanted to allow the same type of financial liquidation to take place that quickly cured the Depression of 1920-21.
Acting in the world, acting "practically," then, is all very well, but doing so without a strong hardcore nucleus means the eventual loss of principle, it means a surrender to liquidationism and "opportunism." This is bound to happen when the hard core is not nurtured and made strong, and it has happened increasingly over recent years.
Within classical revolutionary politics there was always a tradition called 'liquidationism'.
In his own words: "Liquidationism is the rejection or the belittling of the underground, that is, the illegal (and only existing) Party." Lenin held on to the view that "[i]t is only the underground that works out revolutionary tactics and takes those tactics to the masses through both the illegal and the legal press." (46) Just as he had attacked all "deviations" from his view of the party line before, and would continue to do so with even more intensity in later years, after August 1912 Lenin added "liquidationism" to the list of evils that plagued Russian social democracy: nationalism, separatism, bourgeois-democratic liberalism, petit-bourgeois philistinism, economism, and so forth.
While in principle Lenin's accusation of "liquidationism" was directed against the Mensheviks, in practice he used the epithet without discrimination against any social democrat who was not a Bolshevik.
OCAP's struggle will not be easy -- Gramsci's editors hold it to his credit that he refused any easy or unilateral formula for overthrowing fascism, "rejecting the twin, undialectical dev iations of direct frontal attack and 'liquidationism,'" i.e., abandoning the revolutionary perspective.