liquidationist

liquidationist

(ˌlɪkwɪˈdeɪʃənɪst)
adj
(Economics) pertaining to or promoting a theory of economics which holds that governments should not interfere in a recession. Compare individualism3, laissez faire
n
(Economics) a proponent of such a theory
[from liquidation + -ist]
ˌliquiˈdationism n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
This policy is today derisively referred to as "liquidationist."
In his 1932 Republican nomination acceptance speech, he bragged about how he ignored the "liquidationist" advice of Andrew Mellon and pursued government stimulus.
Returning in the 1980s, he resisted Achille Occhetto's successful liquidationist project that saw the PCI re-launched in 1991 as the Democratic Party of the left, its historic connection to the Communist tradition of Gramsci, Togliatti, and Berlinguer severed.
Benjamin oscillated between a "liquidationist" and an "elegiac" attitude to the aura, just as he oscillates in his writings between a specific conception (the aura upon the arrival of photography and film) and another, more general (one could say "experiential") conception, between an aesthetic and an ethical vision.
17-18) retreated or retrenched from his strong anti-price stabilization position and from what was perceived, wrongly according to White (2008), to be his rigid liquidationist views of the 1930s.
What is instead needed is some way of allowing real interest rates to rise, bringing them into closer alignment with subjective rates of time preference, without producing a terrifying "liquidationist" collapse.
"The Cost of Recessions Revisited: A Reverse Liquidationist View." Review of Economic Studies, 2005, 72(2), pp.
If we were forced to choose, surely self-respect would demand the "sectarian" course; the "opportunist" is, by his nature, "liquidationist" of true principle.
Moreover, Ha Huy Tap, from 1936 the leader of the central committee, regarded the Comintern's new emphasis on legal and semi-legal organisations as 'liquidationist, opportunist and rightist'.
Another characteristic example: "The connection between the 'liquidationist question' and the 'national question' is not an invention of ours but has been revealed by the realities of life"; "The 'Vexed Questions' of Our Party," p.
Hardliners seized on the plans of the new leadership and its supporters to denounce us as a "liquidationist" tendency, bent on destroying the Party and turning over its historical and material resources to other left forces.