literalization

(redirected from literalisation)

literalization

(ˌlɪtərəlaɪˈzeɪʃən) or

literalisation

n
the act of making literal or interpreting literally
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
(3) Get Out's pitch-meeting premise (one Peele was sure he would never be allowed to actually make: 'On paper, what you have is something inherently unpleasant--the victimization of black people, the villains being white people' (4)) turns the horrors of racism into a horror movie, its key manoeuvre being the literalisation of black fears in a white world.
The literalisation of the story for streaming-series purposes is encapsulated in the new opening, a long, expository chase scene that was a brief flashback in the film.
Drone surveillance is a literalisation of the evil eye, the gaze which kills.
Nonsense literature frequently makes use of the literalisation of abstractions, as well as set phrases and metaphors to generate a comic effect.
Perhaps it is that the completeness of this song is not friendly to complementarity, but it seems more likely that the director, Anton Corbijn's conception of the theatrical is too unmoving--it is a conception, a frame--and his understanding of Gothic literalisation is without the ironic awareness that in The Bad Seeds' oeuvre becomes transcendence.
"Dreaming of Children: Literalisation in Jane Eyre." Glen 147-67.
The last two centuries have witnessed an increasing literalisation of one of the dominant metaphors which guided the development of early modern science.
(19) The Babadook enters through her back while she is crawling - a literalisation of the idiom 'the devil riding on your back'.
It is the shifts between these different registers of image and rhetoric, and the determining role of our own mobility in their literalisation, that the spectator's movement in the gallery enacts.
There is a shift here in the understanding of inscription from an abstract discursive construct of power/knowledge, to the literalisation of inscription on the body.