literalization


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literalization

(ˌlɪtərəlaɪˈzeɪʃən) or

literalisation

n
the act of making literal or interpreting literally
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
As a final literalization of the poetic word, the bard unceremoniously drops dead after finishing his elegy to the worlds poets.
Attending to the metaphors of VICTORY and PEACE and their literalization provides a window to understand not only Xi's justification of military advancement in China, but also the development of the discourse of postwar remembrance and China's political rhetoric in general.
The first is what he considers literalization of memory which risks trapping one in the remembered event, unable to go beyond it.
In the end, the most profound philosophical tool Marshall has employed in his work is his literalization of blackness: His painted protagonists and surrogates are no shade or hue of brown--they are black.
A subplot with married friends Diane (Molly Shannon) and Nick (Tracy Letts) seems injected to add reliable punchlines but feels overwrought, a literalization of the frustrations of marriage that appears to be out of place.
His radical literalization of the siege as a point of reference prevents the reader from understanding it as merely an extravagant psychological metaphor.
Instead of construing the stage props as a literalization of an anal/sadistic snuff film, we might understand them as a literalization of writing implements: they are not just a horn, a table, and a red-hot rod as Holinshed catalogues, but rather an inkhorn, a writing desk, and a pen (quill or metal nib).
In an uncanny literalization of the cleansing of colonial memory, Lombardi-Diop shows how ads for soap, creams, and powders echo racist thinking from Italy's Fascist period in their promises to scrub darkness away.
Moreover, we should not underestimate the extent to which Western crusaders were motivated by an 'apocalyptic atmosphere', in which a 'literalization or historicization of the Old Testament' led men to die thousands of miles from home in the arid sands of the Levant.
Literalization of metaphors is a recurrent feature of the discourse of and about historical atrocities, when the unthinkable is made real.