literal

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lit·er·al

 (lĭt′ər-əl)
adj.
1. Conforming or limited to the simplest, nonfigurative, or most obvious meaning of a word or words.
2. Word for word; verbatim: a literal translation.
3. Avoiding exaggeration, metaphor, or embellishment; factual; prosaic: a literal description; a literal mind.
4. Consisting of, using, or expressed by letters: literal notation.
n. Computers
A letter or symbol that stands for itself as opposed to a feature, function, or entity associated with it in a programming language: $ can be a symbol that refers to the end of a line, but as a literal, it is a dollar sign.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin litterālis, of letters, from Latin littera, lītera, letter; see letter.]

lit′er·al·ness n.

literal

(ˈlɪtərəl)
adj
1. in exact accordance with or limited to the primary or explicit meaning of a word or text
2. word for word
3. dull, factual, or prosaic
4. consisting of, concerning, or indicated by letters
5. true; actual
6. (Mathematics) maths containing or using coefficients and constants represented by letters: ax2 + b is a literal expression. Compare numerical3a
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) Also called: literal error a misprint or misspelling in a text
[C14: from Late Latin litterālis concerning letters, from Latin littera letter]
ˈliteralness, literality n

lit•er•al

(ˈlɪt ər əl)

adj.
1. in accordance with, involving, or being the primary or strict meaning of a word or words; not figurative or metaphorical.
2. following the words of the original very closely and exactly: a literal translation.
3. true to fact; unembellished; actual or factual: a literal description of conditions.
4. being actually such, without exaggeration or inaccuracy: the literal extermination of a city.
5. tending to construe words in the strict sense or in an unimaginative way.
6. of, pertaining to, or expressed by the letters of the alphabet.
7. affecting a letter or letters: a literal error.
n.
8. a typographical error, esp. involving a single letter.
[1350–1400; < Late Latin litterālis of letters. See letter, -al1]
lit′er•al•ness, n.

literal

literaryliterate
1. 'literal'

The literal meaning of a word is its most basic meaning.

She was older than I was, and not only in the literal sense.
The literal meaning of the Greek word hamartia, translated as sin, is 'missing the mark'.
2. 'literary'

Literary words and expressions are used to create a special effect in poems or novels, and are not usually used in ordinary speech or writing.

'Awaken' and 'waken' are old-fashioned or literary words.

Literary also means 'connected with literature'.

...literary critics.
...literary magazines.
3. 'literate'

A literate person is able to read and write.

Only half the children are literate.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.literal - a mistake in printed matter resulting from mechanical failures of some kindliteral - a mistake in printed matter resulting from mechanical failures of some kind
mistake, error - part of a statement that is not correct; "the book was full of errors"
Adj.1.literal - being or reflecting the essential or genuine character of somethingliteral - being or reflecting the essential or genuine character of something; "her actual motive"; "a literal solitude like a desert"- G.K.Chesterton; "a genuine dilemma"
true - consistent with fact or reality; not false; "the story is true"; "it is undesirable to believe a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true"- B. Russell; "the true meaning of the statement"
2.literal - without interpretation or embellishment; "a literal depiction of the scene before him"
exact - marked by strict and particular and complete accordance with fact; "an exact mind"; "an exact copy"; "hit the exact center of the target"
3.literal - limited to the explicit meaning of a word or text; "a literal translation"
exact - marked by strict and particular and complete accordance with fact; "an exact mind"; "an exact copy"; "hit the exact center of the target"
unrhetorical - not rhetorical
figurative, nonliteral - (used of the meanings of words or text) not literal; using figures of speech; "figurative language"
4.literal - avoiding embellishment or exaggeration (used for emphasis); "it's the literal truth"
plain - not elaborate or elaborated; simple; "plain food"; "stuck to the plain facts"; "a plain blue suit"; "a plain rectangular brick building"

literal

adjective
1. exact, close, strict, accurate, faithful, verbatim, word for word a literal translation
3. actual, real, true, simple, plain, genuine, gospel, bona fide, unvarnished, unexaggerated He was saying no more than the literal truth.

literal

adjective
Employing the very same words as another:
Translations
حَرْفيحَرْفي الفَهْم أو التَّرْجَمَه
doslovnývěrnýčistý
bogstaveligordretrenskinbarlig
kirjaimellinensananmukainensanatarkka
bókstaflegurorîréttur
文字上の文字通り逐語的な
grynaspažodinispažodiškumaspažodžiuitiesiog
burtiskspareizsprecīzs
asılgerçekkelimesi kelimesinesözlük anlamı

literal

[ˈlɪtərəl]
A. ADJ
1. [sense, translation] → literal
they follow a literal interpretation of the Biblesiguen la Biblia al pie de la letra
to be literal about sthtomar algo al pie de la letra
he's a very literal persones una persona que todo se lo toma al pie de la letra
see also literal-minded
2. (as intensifier) a literal factun hecho real
the literal truthla pura verdad
B. N (Typ) → errata f

literal

[ˈlɪtərəl] adj [sense, meaning, translation] → littéral(e)

literal

adj
(esp Typ) literal errorSchreib-/Tipp-/Druckfehler m
translation, meaning, sensewörtlich; in the literal sense (of the word)im wörtlichen Sinne
(= real) that is the literal truthdas ist die reine Wahrheit; it was a literal disasteres war im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes eine Katastrophe; the literal impossibility of working theredie völlige or buchstäbliche Unmöglichkeit, dort zu arbeiten
(= prosaic)nüchtern, prosaisch; he has a very literal mind or is very literal-mindeder denkt sehr nüchtern, er ist sehr prosaisch
nSchreib-/Tipp-/Druckfehler m

literal

[ˈlɪtrl]
1. adj (meaning, translation) → letterale; (account) → testuale; (person) → prosaico/a
2. n (Brit) (Typ) → refuso

literal

(ˈlitərəl) adjective
1. following the exact meaning with no exaggeration. the literal truth.
2. understanding the meaning by taking one word at a time. a literal translation.
ˈliteralness noun
ˈliterally adverb
We had literally a minute to catch the train.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lending the various depicted works the character traits of their producers, from Hans Arp to Michael Schwarze; the tongue-in-cheek novel literalizes the conceptual themes of the exhibition.
But just as Parks literalizes romantic cliches, she satirically points out how George's trousseau is modified for battlefield use.
Gibson literalizes the possibility of femininity on such a militant hero as a void, becoming figuratively unrepresentable.
An unusual technical feature of the film that literalizes this blurring of boundaries between real and imaginary actions is utilized in the very first scene: the camera lens appears to be out of focus around its periphery, so the image is sharper at the centre, fuzzy at the edges, often accompanied by a 'ghosting' effect.
When she offers a visual meditation on that ecstatic postgoal moment, she literalizes this explosive joy as men coming apart in each other's arms.
Eggers's imperiled immobility when confronted by familial "antiques" literalizes the anxiety of psychic stasis.
The off-rhyme of "I liked it" and the "taste of her cherry ChapStick" literalizes such forbidden fruit.
Todd Gray's series of photographs of himself smeared in shaving cream literalizes Frantz Fanon's "white mask" in a era where black skin is yet another niche market, while Virginia Nimarkoh's Nubian Queen (1999) drawings appropriate the skills of sidewalk artists both to celebrate and challenge the often invoked desire for authentic representation.
First, he literalizes the high costs that individuals pay in terms of their human rights in a neo-liberal regime and, second, he represents culture jamming and other forms of anti-corporate activism, reminding his readers that these practices can become part of the repertoire of resistance to such regimes.
Johnson literalizes the aesthetics of symphonic sublimation to show that the pleasure that the symphony promises to deliver centers on the presentation of an alluring but impossible trajectory.
Her vision, born of a trauma she cannot speak, is typically Shelleyan: it demands the materialization of experience (just as her revenge against her father literalizes this vision's darker subtext) at the same time that it questions the "efficacy and durability of the poetic imagination itself in the "real world" of persons who experience themselves, at least in part, in terms of their bodies and the physical actions of their bodies" (120).
Rowe demonstrates that when Ferdinand offers the dead hand to the Duchess, it is a marvelously overdetermined movement that evokes the allegory of the "body marital," literalizes the gift of hands in marriage, and challenges "couverture" (the legal fiction that the wife merges into the person of the husband) (94).