literal

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lit·er·al

 (lĭt′ər-əl)
adj.
1. Conforming or limited to the simplest, nonfigurative, or most obvious meaning of a word or words.
2. Word for word; verbatim: a literal translation.
3. Avoiding exaggeration, metaphor, or embellishment; factual; prosaic: a literal description; a literal mind.
4. Consisting of, using, or expressed by letters: literal notation.
n. Computers
A letter or symbol that stands for itself as opposed to a feature, function, or entity associated with it in a programming language: $ can be a symbol that refers to the end of a line, but as a literal, it is a dollar sign.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin litterālis, of letters, from Latin littera, lītera, letter; see letter.]

lit′er·al·ness n.

literal

(ˈlɪtərəl)
adj
1. in exact accordance with or limited to the primary or explicit meaning of a word or text
2. word for word
3. dull, factual, or prosaic
4. consisting of, concerning, or indicated by letters
5. true; actual
6. (Mathematics) maths containing or using coefficients and constants represented by letters: ax2 + b is a literal expression. Compare numerical3a
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) Also called: literal error a misprint or misspelling in a text
[C14: from Late Latin litterālis concerning letters, from Latin littera letter]
ˈliteralness, literality n

lit•er•al

(ˈlɪt ər əl)

adj.
1. in accordance with, involving, or being the primary or strict meaning of a word or words; not figurative or metaphorical.
2. following the words of the original very closely and exactly: a literal translation.
3. true to fact; unembellished; actual or factual: a literal description of conditions.
4. being actually such, without exaggeration or inaccuracy: the literal extermination of a city.
5. tending to construe words in the strict sense or in an unimaginative way.
6. of, pertaining to, or expressed by the letters of the alphabet.
7. affecting a letter or letters: a literal error.
n.
8. a typographical error, esp. involving a single letter.
[1350–1400; < Late Latin litterālis of letters. See letter, -al1]
lit′er•al•ness, n.

literal

literaryliterate
1. 'literal'

The literal meaning of a word is its most basic meaning.

She was older than I was, and not only in the literal sense.
The literal meaning of the Greek word hamartia, translated as sin, is 'missing the mark'.
2. 'literary'

Literary words and expressions are used to create a special effect in poems or novels, and are not usually used in ordinary speech or writing.

'Awaken' and 'waken' are old-fashioned or literary words.

Literary also means 'connected with literature'.

...literary critics.
...literary magazines.
3. 'literate'

A literate person is able to read and write.

Only half the children are literate.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.literal - a mistake in printed matter resulting from mechanical failures of some kindliteral - a mistake in printed matter resulting from mechanical failures of some kind
mistake, error - part of a statement that is not correct; "the book was full of errors"
Adj.1.literal - being or reflecting the essential or genuine character of somethingliteral - being or reflecting the essential or genuine character of something; "her actual motive"; "a literal solitude like a desert"- G.K.Chesterton; "a genuine dilemma"
true - consistent with fact or reality; not false; "the story is true"; "it is undesirable to believe a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true"- B. Russell; "the true meaning of the statement"
2.literal - without interpretation or embellishment; "a literal depiction of the scene before him"
exact - marked by strict and particular and complete accordance with fact; "an exact mind"; "an exact copy"; "hit the exact center of the target"
3.literal - limited to the explicit meaning of a word or text; "a literal translation"
exact - marked by strict and particular and complete accordance with fact; "an exact mind"; "an exact copy"; "hit the exact center of the target"
unrhetorical - not rhetorical
figurative, nonliteral - (used of the meanings of words or text) not literal; using figures of speech; "figurative language"
4.literal - avoiding embellishment or exaggeration (used for emphasis); "it's the literal truth"
plain - not elaborate or elaborated; simple; "plain food"; "stuck to the plain facts"; "a plain blue suit"; "a plain rectangular brick building"

literal

adjective
1. exact, close, strict, accurate, faithful, verbatim, word for word a literal translation
3. actual, real, true, simple, plain, genuine, gospel, bona fide, unvarnished, unexaggerated He was saying no more than the literal truth.

literal

adjective
Employing the very same words as another:
Translations
حَرْفيحَرْفي الفَهْم أو التَّرْجَمَه
doslovnývěrnýčistý
bogstaveligordretrenskinbarlig
kirjaimellinensananmukainensanatarkka
bókstaflegurorîréttur
文字上の文字通り逐語的な
grynaspažodinispažodiškumaspažodžiuitiesiog
burtiskspareizsprecīzs
asılgerçekkelimesi kelimesinesözlük anlamı

literal

[ˈlɪtərəl]
A. ADJ
1. [sense, translation] → literal
they follow a literal interpretation of the Biblesiguen la Biblia al pie de la letra
to be literal about sthtomar algo al pie de la letra
he's a very literal persones una persona que todo se lo toma al pie de la letra
see also literal-minded
2. (as intensifier) a literal factun hecho real
the literal truthla pura verdad
B. N (Typ) → errata f

literal

[ˈlɪtərəl] adj [sense, meaning, translation] → littéral(e)

literal

adj
(esp Typ) literal errorSchreib-/Tipp-/Druckfehler m
translation, meaning, sensewörtlich; in the literal sense (of the word)im wörtlichen Sinne
(= real) that is the literal truthdas ist die reine Wahrheit; it was a literal disasteres war im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes eine Katastrophe; the literal impossibility of working theredie völlige or buchstäbliche Unmöglichkeit, dort zu arbeiten
(= prosaic)nüchtern, prosaisch; he has a very literal mind or is very literal-mindeder denkt sehr nüchtern, er ist sehr prosaisch
nSchreib-/Tipp-/Druckfehler m

literal

[ˈlɪtrl]
1. adj (meaning, translation) → letterale; (account) → testuale; (person) → prosaico/a
2. n (Brit) (Typ) → refuso

literal

(ˈlitərəl) adjective
1. following the exact meaning with no exaggeration. the literal truth.
2. understanding the meaning by taking one word at a time. a literal translation.
ˈliteralness noun
ˈliterally adverb
We had literally a minute to catch the train.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chapter four examines Henry's rejection of the distinguishing role of relations and his literalizing of the psychological model.
With useful comparisons to models in science and sensitive to the risks of literalizing models, she selfcritically assesses the limits of religious language.
Reyna built a crude foamcore environment into Caesar's small white cube (located in a dingy Garfield Park studio building), literalizing the "glass ceiling" effect while drawing on a range of stereotypes: teenage-girl aesthetics, alternative art spaces, contemporary abstraction, and thrift culture.
Bullets are not necessarily specific" --and literalizing cliches of the 1960s: "syzygy" (a then-fashionable Jungian term for the union of opposites), "hang tight" (await further instructions), "reality theater" (as in happenings and agitprop theater), and "the target then / can disappear" (as in Zen and the Art of Archery).
Real Girl" Bianca does the opposite: by literalizing the "to-be-looked-at-ness" that Laura Mulvey identifies as the definitive feature of the female romantic object in Hollywood cinema, Bianca removes entirely the life of the standard cinematic object of love, immediately plunging the notorious translation of it from subject into object by the agonistic male gaze.
Critically and poetically, each of Muldoon's poems dramatizes the tensions (and collisions) within this fantasy of perpetual and autonomous motion by literalizing it in the otherwise allegorical vehicle, be it animal, automobile, or both.
After grave robbers "raise" and mutilate Lazarus's body, thus literalizing Brik's conflation of Averbuch with his biblical counterpart, Olga attends a public burial of the rediscovered corpse, compromising her Orthodox faith to spare her community a possible revenge attack.
Preliminary discussion here of Blake's mystical yet literalizing rejoinder to Locke, for whom signs were both arbitrary and humanly instituted, and of Shelley's more internal challenge to Enlightenment doctrine, helps set up fuller treatments of both writers later in the book.
Katherine countered by literalizing Petruchio's insult, crawling on all fours toward the dish, then licking its contents like the wild Kate, or cat, that Petruchio thought to tame.
This poignant illustration of devastated motherhood exemplifies the problematics of literalizing Beloved on screen.
By focusing on the potential subversion of literalizing metaphor, Ray contends that early modern drama allowed, and perhaps even encouraged, its audiences to envision the possibility of change.
The literalizing of the Christ event in Christian preaching and teaching has failed to communicate this religious event at the deeper symbolic and metaphorical level where people unconsciously live their lives.