lion

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li·on

 (lī′ən)
n.
1. A large carnivorous feline mammal (Panthera leo) of Africa and northwest India, having a short tawny coat, a tufted tail, and, in the male, a heavy mane around the neck and shoulders.
2. A mountain lion.
3.
a. A very brave person.
b. A person regarded as fierce or savage.
c. A noted person; a celebrity: a literary lion.
4. Lion See Leo.
Idiom:
lion's share
The greatest or best part.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin leō, leōn-, from Greek leōn, of Semitic origin; see lbʔ in Semitic roots.]
Word History: Old French lion is the source of English lion, and the Old French word comes from Latin leō, leōnis. The Latin word is related somehow to Greek leōn, leontos (earlier *lewōn, *lewontos), which appears in the name of the Spartan king Leonidas, "Lion's son," who perished at Thermopylae. The Greek word is somehow related to Coptic labai, laboi, "lioness." In turn, Coptic labai is borrowed from a Semitic source related to Hebrew lābī' and Akkadian labbu. There is also a native ancient Egyptian word, rw (where r can stand for either r or l and vowels were not indicated), which is surely related as well. Since lions were native to Africa, Asia, and Europe in ancient times (Aristotle tells us there were lions in Macedon in his day), we have no way of ascertaining who borrowed which word from whom.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lion

(ˈlaɪən)
n
1. (Animals) a large gregarious predatory feline mammal, Panthera leo, of open country in parts of Africa and India, having a tawny yellow coat and, in the male, a shaggy mane.
2. (Heraldry) a conventionalized lion, the principal beast used as an emblem in heraldry. It has become the national emblem of Great Britain
3. a courageous, strong, or bellicose person
4. a celebrity or idol who attracts much publicity and a large following
5. beard the lion in his den to approach a feared or influential person, esp in order to ask a favour
6. the lion's share the largest portion
[Old English līo, lēo (Middle English lioun, from Anglo-French liun), both from Latin leo, Greek leōn]

Lion

(ˈlaɪən)
n
(Astrology) the Lion the constellation Leo, the fifth sign of the zodiac
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

li•on

(ˈlaɪ ən)

n.
1. a large, usu. tawny-yellow cat, Panthera leo, of Africa and S Asia, having a tufted tail and, in the male, a large mane.
2. a person of great strength or courage.
3. a prominent or influential person who is sought after as a celebrity: a literary lion.
4. (cap.) Leo 1.
5. (cap.) a member of a Lions Club.
[1200–50; < Old French, variant of leon < Latin leōnem, acc. of leō < Greek léōn; replacing Middle English, Old English lēo < Latin]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lion - large gregarious predatory feline of Africa and India having a tawny coat with a shaggy mane in the malelion - large gregarious predatory feline of Africa and India having a tawny coat with a shaggy mane in the male
lion cub - a young lion
mane - long coarse hair growing from the crest of the animal's neck
big cat, cat - any of several large cats typically able to roar and living in the wild
genus Panthera, Panthera - lions; leopards; snow leopards; jaguars; tigers; cheetahs; saber-toothed tigers
lioness - a female lion
lionet - a small or young lion
pride - a group of lions
2.lion - a celebrity who is lionized (much sought after)
celebrity, famous person - a widely known person; "he was a baseball celebrity"
3.lion - (astrology) a person who is born while the sun is in LeoLion - (astrology) a person who is born while the sun is in Leo
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
astrology, star divination - a pseudoscience claiming divination by the positions of the planets and sun and moon
4.Lion - the fifth sign of the zodiac; the sun is in this sign from about July 23 to August 22
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

lion

noun
1. hero, champion, fighter, warrior, conqueror, lionheart, brave person a frail little man, but with the heart of a lion
2. celebrity, star, superstar, idol, wonder, notable, big name, prodigy, luminary, celeb (informal), megastar (informal), V.I.P. By the 1920s Kahlil Gibran was a social and literary lion.
lion's share majority part, most, bulk, greater part, preponderance Nuclear research has received the lion's share of public funding.
Related words
adjective leonine
female lioness
young cub
collective nouns pride, troop
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

lion

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
أَسَدٌأسَد
levlvice
løve
leono
lõvi
leijona
lav
oroszlán
singa
ljón
ライオン
사자
leo
liūtasdidžiausia dalis
lauva
leu
lev
lev
lejon
simba
สิงโต
con sư tửsư tử

lion

[ˈlaɪən]
A. Nleón m (fig) → celebridad f
the lion's sharela parte del león, la mejor parte
to beard the lion in his denentrar en el cubil de la fiera
to put one's head in the lion's mouthmeterse en la boca del lobo
to throw sb to the lionsabandonar a algn a su suerte
B. CPD lion cub Ncachorro m de león
lion tamer Ndomador(a) m/f de leones
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

lion

[ˈlaɪən] nlion mlion cub nlionceau m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

lion

nLöwe m; he was one of the literary lions of his dayer war einer der bedeutendsten or größten Schriftsteller seiner Zeit; to fight or battle like a lionkämpfen wie ein Löwe; to throw somebody to the lions (fig)jdn den Löwen zum Fraß vorwerfen; the lion’s shareder Löwenanteil
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

lion

[ˈlaɪən] nleone m (fig) (person) → celebrità f inv
to get or take the lion's share → fare la parte del leone
to put one's head in the lion's mouth (fig) → cacciarsi nei guai
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

lion

(ˈlaiən) feminine ˈlioness noun
a type of large, flesh-eating animal of the cat family, the male of which has a long, coarse mane.
the lion's share
the largest share.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

lion

أَسَدٌ lev løve Löwe λιοντάρι león leijona lion lav leone ライオン 사자 leeuw løve lew leão лев lejon สิงโต aslan con sư tử 狮子
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in periodicals archive ?
"A Survey: Black Writers' Views on Literary Lions and Values." Negro Digest 17.3 (Jan.
Following his death, Roth was celebrated as the last of the white male literary lions to roar through American letters in the 20th century, a group including Norman Mailer, John Updike and Joseph Heller among others.
Dublin's literary lions included Jonathan Swift, Oscar Wilde, James Joyce, Samuel Beckett, and W B.
Literary lions including Pulitzer Prize winners William Faulkner and Tennessee Williams made a beeline for 214 Royal Street - and Truman Capote joked he was born here.
There was a small luncheon at the Mailer house and the two literary lions were in fine mettle, roaring and exploring their respective interests and experiences, old and new, the entire afternoon.
Bloomsbury also attracted literary lions long before the arrival of Virginia Woolf and her coterie: Charles Dickens, William Thackeray, Anthony Trollope, William Morris, and J.
Pacheco works through the careers of each of the aforementioned literary lions, and ferrets out the steps that each took from a mere reporter of education reform to a full-blown novelist.
He was passionately championed by literary lions such as James Baldwin (for whom he was something of a father figure) and Henry Miller, but his place in the history of art still seems uncertain.
And book critics and literary lions, prone to dismiss crime novels as mere entertainments, competed for adjectives to praise him.
Chapter four indicates how such conflicts precipitated a breach between literary lions Charles Dickens and William Makepeace Thackeray with significant consequences for their publishers.
A number of Victorian literary lions also make cameo appearances in these pages, notably H.G.
Stuffed to the gills with media types and literary lions from the middle of the past century, this is as much time capsule as film, and will appeal to anyone who subscribed--or still does--to Plimpton's Paris Review, and harbors fond memories of his one-off stunts.