literate

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lit·er·ate

 (lĭt′ər-ĭt)
adj.
1.
a. Able to read and write.
b. Knowledgeable or educated in a particular field or fields.
2. Familiar with literature; literary.
3. Well-written; polished: a literate essay.
n.
1. A person who is literate.
2. (used with a pl. verb) People who are literate, considered as a group.

[Middle English litterate, from Latin litterātus, from littera, lītera, letter; see letter.]

lit′er·ate·ly adv.
lit′er·ate·ness n.
Usage Note: For most of its long history in English, literate has meant only "familiar with literature," or more generally, "well-educated, learned." Only since the late 1800s has it also come to refer to the basic ability to read and write. Its antonym illiterate has an equally broad range of meanings: an illiterate person may be incapable of reading a shopping list or uneducated in a particular field. The term functional illiterate is often used to describe a person who can read or write to some degree but below a minimum level required to function in even a limited social situation or job setting. An aliterate person, by contrast, is one who is capable of reading and writing but who has little interest in doing so, whether out of indifference to learning in general or from a preference for seeking information and entertainment by other means. The meanings of the words literacy and illiteracy have been extended from their original connection with reading and literature to any body of knowledge. For example, "geographic illiterates" cannot identify the countries on a map, and "computer illiterates" are unable to operate computers effectively.

literate

(ˈlɪtərɪt)
adj
1. able to read and write
2. educated; learned
3. used to words rather than numbers as a means of expression. Compare numerate
n
a literate person
[C15: from Latin litterātus learned. See letter]
ˈliterately adv

lit•er•ate

(ˈlɪt ər ɪt)

adj.
1. able to read and write.
2. having or showing knowledge of literature, writing, etc.; literary; well-read.
3. characterized by skill, lucidity, or the like.
4. having knowledge or skill in a specified field: computer-literate.
5. having an education; educated.
n.
6. a person who can read and write.
7. a learned person.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin līterātus,litterātus learned]
lit′er•ate•ly, adv.

literal

literaryliterate
1. 'literal'

The literal meaning of a word is its most basic meaning.

She was older than I was, and not only in the literal sense.
The literal meaning of the Greek word hamartia, translated as sin, is 'missing the mark'.
2. 'literary'

Literary words and expressions are used to create a special effect in poems or novels, and are not usually used in ordinary speech or writing.

'Awaken' and 'waken' are old-fashioned or literary words.

Literary also means 'connected with literature'.

...literary critics.
...literary magazines.
3. 'literate'

A literate person is able to read and write.

Only half the children are literate.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.literate - a person who can read and writeliterate - a person who can read and write  
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
alphabetiser, alphabetizer - a literate person who can arrange items in alphabetical order
reader - a person who can read; a literate person
writer - a person who is able to write and has written something
Adj.1.literate - able to read and write
illiterate - not able to read or write
2.literate - versed in literature; dealing with literature
educated - possessing an education (especially having more than average knowledge)
sophisticated - having or appealing to those having worldly knowledge and refinement and savoir-faire; "sophisticated young socialites"; "a sophisticated audience"; "a sophisticated lifestyle"; "a sophisticated book"
illiterate - lacking culture, especially in language and literature
3.literate - knowledgeable and educated in one or several fields; "computer literate"
educated - possessing an education (especially having more than average knowledge)

literate

adjective educated, lettered, learned, cultured, informed, scholarly, cultivated, knowledgeable, well-informed, erudite, well-read The lyrics are highly literate; they even quote Voltaire.

literate

adjective
Having an education:
Translations
مُلِم ، ذكي وكثير القِراءَه
gramotnýsečtělý
dannetkulitiveretuddannet
írni-olvasni tudó
bóklærîurlæs og skrifandi
raštingasraštingumas
izglītotslasīt un rakstīt protošsskolots
gramotný
kültürlüokumuşokur yazar

literate

[ˈlɪtərɪt] ADJque sabe leer y escribir
highly literateculto
not very literate (fig) → poco culto, que tiene poca cultura

literate

[ˈlɪtərət] adj
(= able to read and write) → qui sait lire et écrire
to be literate → savoir lire et écrire
(= well-educated) → instruit(e)
the children of highly literate parents → les enfants de parents très instruits
[applicant, employee] → à l'aise avec les mots
Scientists need to be literate as well as numerate → Les scientifiques doivent être à l'aise avec les mots ainsi qu'avec les chiffres.

literate

adj
to be literatelesen und schreiben können; they aim to achieve a literate population in one generationsie wollen die Bevölkerung in einer Generation alphabetisieren
(= well-educated)gebildet; his style is not very literateer schreibt einen ungeschliffenen Stil

literate

[ˈlɪtərɪt] adjche sa leggere e scrivere
highly literate → molto colto/a, molto istruito/a

literate

(ˈlitərət) adjective
1. able to read and write.
2. clever and having read a great deal.
ˈliteracy noun
References in periodicals archive ?
Not that they don't want to be - hence the proliferation of hubs and flexible working spaces, often with exposed brick and old-school (literately and figuratively) table and chairs.
Without the developing ability to communicate literately the forced separation of men and women could have resulted in tribal disintegration.
Because of the tightness of the syndesmosis joint, the wedging of the talus literately forces the other two bones in the joint to move outwards, causing fracture dislocation.
Literately, there has been much of writing about research ethics in general, but there are few documents that focus on the ethics of human trafficking research in particular.
This literately means that the African people live inside a loaded automatic handgun ready to fire at any time.
In both cases, the plans literately transform otherwise marginal hunting ground into a well-oiled machine that keeps holding good bucks and offering chances to harvest them.
Following the alphabetical arrangement of his previous volume, The Big, Bad Book of Botany (Morrow, $18.99, 416 pages, ISBN 9780062282750) goes not only literally from Absinthe to Zubrowka, but literately as well.
Rob Auerbach, president of Louisville, Ky.-based CandyRific, a manufacturer of licensed and unlicensed novelty confectionery, agrees with LeBel that since "impulse is the prevalent behavior [in the candy category,] an emotional 'hook' is needed, such as a positive licensed character, value discount or new offering." Consequently, "end caps or floor displays are important, where the shopper literately runs into the items," he notes.